4-7th* November, 2018 Kilkenny, Ireland

2018 Highlights

See more on Youtube

Top 5 Presentations 2018:

Our Ethos

NodeConf EU is first and foremost about community. A community that is kind to its members, a community that values diversity. It's a gathering of minds in an informal setting.
It offers attendees an opportunity to meet with their friends, peers and speakers in a relaxed, welcoming, friendly and most importantly respectful environment.

Agenda 2018

18:00

- 20:00

  • Early Registration
  • Details coming soon

19:30

  • Welcome Reception and Drinks
  • Details coming soon

08:50 - 09:00

  • Welcome by Cian O'Maidin

    Cian is a founder and CEO at nearForm, Europe’s leading Node.js consulting company read more

    One of NearForm’s core philosophies is to give more than we take from the world. We are a zealous open source company and consider it our duty, as good citizens, to bolster our community and to support worthy contributors whenever we can.

    With an unrelenting focus on accelerating the progress of modern software delivery, we are uniquely positioned to cultivate and mature disruptive technologies. NearForm’s work in open source software (OSS), and our contribution to the Node.js project in particular, builds value for the wider ecosystem – and we can weave this accumulated value back into all that we do.

  • Registration from 8:00am / Welcome in McCurdy 1 & 2

09:00 - 09:25

  • Holding on to your Performance Promises by Maya Lekova and Benedikt Meurer

    Maya is passionate about C++ and JavaScript, striving to explain complex concepts in a simple way. She comes from teaching and game development background and recently joined the JavaScript Foundations team at Google to work on asynchrony in V8. read more

    Benedikt is a JavaScript compiler engineer who loves to tinker with different aspects of programming languages. At Google he is working on the V8 JavaScript engine that powers both Node.js and Chrome, and he is currently leading the Node.js Performance Effort.

    The ES2015 revision of JavaScript introduced Promises as primitives for asynchronous operations and generators as primitives for concurrent programming. read more

    On top of that ES2017/18 added async functions and generators. This talk briefly explores these primitives, and dives into the performance peculiarities of Promises-based programming paradigms. We’ll especially look into how these operations perform in V8, the JavaScript engine that powers both Node.js and Chrome.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

09:30 - 09:55

  • Going FaaSter: Function as a Service at Netflix by Yunong Xiao

    Yunong is a principal software engineer at Netflix in Los Gatos, CA. He currently leads the design and architecture of the Netflix API Platform. read more

    He spent stints of his career at AWS and Joyent, where he worked on distributed systems and helped to shape and build several cloud computing products such as AWS IAM and Manta. He also maintains the open source Node.js framework restify. Yunong received a BaSc with honours in Computer Engineering from the University of Waterloo.

    The FaaS revolution is taking the world by storm. It just so happens that JavaScript has become the lingua franca of the FaaS revolution. read more

    Customers love the no-ops and ergonomics of this new paradigm. They enable a revolution in developer velocity, allowing engineers to deploy code to production much faster than before.

    At Netflix, these features are a perfect fit for the Netflix API Platform, which provides engineers the ability to write and deploy tier-1 services using JS without having to manage infrastructure or operations.

    However, there are trade-offs to consider. Most FaaS offerings today are great for latency insensitive tasks, but not for fully fledged services that need to be isolated, low latency, reliable, and elastically scalable.

    Learn about the architecture and internals of Netflix’s JS FaaS platform, which lets engineers deploy JS functions as isolated, reliable, and low latency production services.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

10.00 - 10.25

  • Let's build a doppelganger game! by Simona Cotin

    Simona is a web developer with experience in building enterprise data visualization tools using Angular and more recently building apps in the cloud. read more

    Communities power her up and that’s why she is co-organising the London Javascript and Angular Dublin meetups. Passionate about knowledge sharing, she has mentored at workshops for Women Who Code and NgGirls encouraging women to learn more about programming.

    You’ve always thought you looked like Marty McFly but your friends say you look like Yoda, take the 80s doppleganger challenge and find out for sure! read more

    In this talk, I’ll show how to use a little bit of machine learning and serverless tech to build an application that can match faces to their dopplegangers. All written with Angular and Node!

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

10:30 - 10:55

  • Coffee Break

11:00 - 11:25

  • Predicting the Internet of Things with Tensorflow.js by Taron Foxworth

    Taron Foxworth wants to translate technology for people to learn, love, and be inspired. Taron is the Lead Technical Evangelist at Losant and an adjunct professor at Xavier University. Taron was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, then relocated to Cincinnati, Ohio. Taron is currently interested in all things food and whiskey, IoT, Blockchain, Node.js, buzz words, and other really random things.

    I wondered, can I use JavaScript to predict if a machine will fail? With Tensorflow.js, some sensors, and a little elbow grease, this is totally possible. read more

    As the price of Internet-connected chips drops, it is now possible to connect anything – literally anything – to the Internet. But we're generating so much data off of these devices that we need some help making sense of it all. Enter machine learning. This talk is an introduction to machine learning – what it is (and is not!), how it is beneficial, and how you as a JS developer can start learning. We'll cover the basics of building a model and using Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), and use these skills to predict machine failure. JavaScript developers can use their skills to program the web, build cloud-based applications, develop games and robotics – and now, with Tensorflow.js, you can add machine learning to your repertoire.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

11:30 - 11:55

  • GraphQL - accelerated by Matteo Collina and Mathias Buus

    Mathias Buus is a self taught JavaScript hacker from Copenhagen that has been working with Node.js since the 0.2 days. Mathias likes to work with P2P and distributed systems and is the author of more than 650 modules on npm. He is also the Chief of Research at Beaker leading the technical work on the Dat protocol. read more

    Matteo is a code pirate and mad scientist. He spends most of his days programming in Node.js, but in the past he worked with Ruby, Java and Objective-C. In 2014, he defended his Ph.D. thesis titled 'Application Platforms for the Internet of Things'. Now he is a Principal Architect at nearForm, where he consults for the top brands of the world. Matteo is also the author of the Node.js MQTT Broker, Mosca, the fast logger Pino and of the Fastify web framework. Matteo is also a member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee. Matteo spoke at several international conferences: Node.js Interactive, NodeConf.eu, NodeSummit, LXJS, Distill by Engine Yard, and JsDay to name a few. He is also co-author of the book Javascript: Best Practices edited by FAG, Milan. In the summer he loves sailing the Sirocco.

    GraphQL is a query language that is rapidly gaining wide adoption across the community. It combines type validation with a query and filtering syntax that makes it easy to get up-and-running with a powerful web API in almost no time. read more

    Features like running parallel queries or update-all become much easier, because they are first class citizens of GraphQL. Add to that a vibrant community that keeps creating excellent tooling and documentation, it’s clear why GraphQL has become so popular with developers

    Every abstraction has a cost, and GraphQL is no exception. The added complexity and a new schema format to parse and execute mean new performance bottlenecks. In addition to performance issues, the wrong use of GraphQL can lead to architectural bottlenecks. Instead of viewing this as a problem we took this as a challenge.

    In this talk we’ll cover what GraphQL is, why it’s great and how we made it run a lot faster on Node.js, in fact *much* faster, using different performance techniques that we have learned in the last few years.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

12:00 - 12:25

  • Build the API you want to see in the world by Michelle Garrett

    Three years ago I learned to code. Now I'm a Software Engineer at Condé Nast International in London, writing JS with React and Node. I also organise Node Girls London, which hosts free JavaScript workshops for gender minorities in tech.

    Have you ever used a third party API, and hated it? You don't have to live with it! I'll be sharing my experience transforming ugly JSON into the GraphQL API of my dreams. read more

    I'll speak about how GraphQL helped me get the data I wanted, and share some strategies for designing schema you'll love. By the end of this talk, you'll understand how GraphQL can improve the quality of your data, and life.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

12:30 - 12:55

  • Node ES Modules - something almost, but not quite entirely unlike CommonJS by Gil Tayar

    30 years of experience have not dulled the fascination Gil Tayar has with software development. From the olden days of DOS, to the contemporary world of Software Testing, Gil was, is, and always will be, a software developer. He has in the past co-founded WebCollage, survived the bubble collapse of 2000, and worked on various big cloudy projects at Wix. read more

    His current passion is figuring out how to test software, a passion which he has turned into his main job as Evangelist and Senior Architect at Applitools. He has religiously tested all his software, from the early days as a junior software developer to the current days at Applitools, where he develops tests for software that tests software, which is almost one meta layer too many for him.

    In his private life, he is a dad to two lovely kids (and a cat), an avid reader of Science Fiction, (he counts Samuel Delany, Robert Silverberg, and Robert Heinlein as favorites) and a passionate film buff. (Stanley Kubrick, Lars Von Trier, David Cronenberg, anybody?)

    Unfortunately for him, he hasn’t really answered the big question of his life - he still doesn't know whether static languages or dynamic languages are best.

    CommonJS, along with the npm registry, has become the de-facto standard in Frontend and NodeJS development today. But Native ES Modules are coming to NodeJS and the browser. read more

    On the surface, they look incredibly similar to CommonJS modules, but the differences are important. In this talk I will describe these differences, the consequences of these differences, and how to start preparing for the new world of Native ES Modules.

    Why is this talk important? Because Native ES Modules _are_ coming. And everybody will be talking about them in 2019. And we need to be prepared, for it _is_ going to be a difficult transition, because the differences are subtle and they bite.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

13:00 - 14:00

  • Lunch

14:00 15:30

  • A New Way To Profile Async Activity In Node.js Mathias Buus Madsen & Matteo Collina

    Mathias Buus is a self taught JavaScript hacker from Copenhagen that has been working with Node.js since the 0.2 days. read more

    Mathias likes to work with P2P and distributed systems and is the author of more than 650 modules on npm. He is also the Chief of Research at Beaker leading the technical work on the Dat protocol.

    Node works best in heavily-I/O-related contexts, and often acts as a mediator between many data streams and interfaces. Due to JavaScript’s evented nature, most I/O is performed asynchronously. read more

    Especially when our Node process is a networked application. If we can measure asynchronous activity in a decoupled way, we can find out where an application is waiting.

    This means we can diagnose I/O problems in external infrastructure! This workshop introduced a innovative visualization tool that diagnoses various infrastructural and architectural issues.

    Attendees will learn the following:

    * How to identify and reduce latency in your servers
    * Finding and fixing significant asynchronous bottlenecks
    * Using Node.js to identify problems in your server architecture
    * How to debug asynchronous behavior
    * When (and how) to use development profiling vs APM-based production profiling

    Matteo is a code pirate and mad scientist. He spends most of his days programming in Node.js, but in the past he worked with Ruby, Java and Objective-C. In 2014, he defended his Ph.D. thesis titled 'Application Platforms for the Internet of Things'. read more

    Now he is a Principal Architect at nearForm, where he consults for the top brands of the world. Matteo is also the author of the Node.js MQTT Broker, Mosca, the fast logger Pino and of the Fastify web framework. Matteo is also a member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee. Matteo spoke at several international conferences: Node.js Interactive, NodeConf.eu, NodeSummit, LXJS, Distill by Engine Yard, and JsDay to name a few. He is also co-author of the book Javascript: Best Practices edited by FAG, Milan. In the summer he loves sailing the Sirocco.

  • Workshop 1 (P1) / McCurdy 1 & 2
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

14:00 - 15:30

  • OK Google, how to build a Node.js transactional application on Google Assistant from A to Z? by Marie Terrier

    After 3 years as web developer in KRDS India social media agency, Marie moved back to KRDS Paris in 2014 as technical consultant (still 1/3 of the time in India). read more

    She is now enjoying life full time in Paris as OhMyBot! CTO, building Yelda.ai chatbots and assistants management platform and sometime mentoring Node.js learners in NodeSchool Paris events !

    Many of us already had conversations with simple chatbots or assistants, but how would you design, develop, deploy and monitor a conversational application with payments? read more

    This winter I was fortunate enough to develop the first French transactional Google Assistant application for a big French retailer. From this experience, this workshop will walk through developing a small NodeJS transactional chatbot on Google Assistant with the help of DialogFlow and Google Actions SDK, and deploying it on Google Firebase serverless hosting and database.

  • Workshop 2 / McCurdy 3
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

14:00 15:30

  • Create and Deploy Microservices using CloudNativeJS.io capabilities Speaker info coming soon

    Description: Create, Deploy, Monitor, and then Breath Easy. Learn how to take a simple Express.js application and make it “cloud native”, adding health checks, monitoring with Prometheus, and request tracking with Zipkin, and more. read more

    You’ll deploy your services to Docker and Kubernetes locally and then to the Cloud.

    TBC read more

    TBC read more

    read more

  • IBM Workshop/ Maginnes Suite 1, & 3
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

15:30 - 15:55

  • Coffee break

16:00 17:30

  • A New Way To Profile Async Activity In Node.js Mathias Buus Madsen & Matteo Collina

    Mathias Buus is a self taught JavaScript hacker from Copenhagen that has been working with Node.js since the 0.2 days. read more

    Mathias likes to work with P2P and distributed systems and is the author of more than 650 modules on npm. He is also the Chief of Research at Beaker leading the technical work on the Dat protocol.

    Node works best in heavily-I/O-related contexts, and often acts as a mediator between many data streams and interfaces. Due to JavaScript’s evented nature, most I/O is performed asynchronously. read more

    Especially when our Node process is a networked application. If we can measure asynchronous activity in a decoupled way, we can find out where an application is waiting.

    This means we can diagnose I/O problems in external infrastructure! This workshop introduced a innovative visualization tool that diagnoses various infrastructural and architectural issues.

    Attendees will learn the following:

    * How to identify and reduce latency in your servers
    * Finding and fixing significant asynchronous bottlenecks
    * Using Node.js to identify problems in your server architecture
    * How to debug asynchronous behavior
    * When (and how) to use development profiling vs APM-based production profiling

    Matteo is a code pirate and mad scientist. He spends most of his days programming in Node.js, but in the past he worked with Ruby, Java and Objective-C. In 2014, he defended his Ph.D. thesis titled 'Application Platforms for the Internet of Things'. read more

    Now he is a Principal Architect at nearForm, where he consults for the top brands of the world. Matteo is also the author of the Node.js MQTT Broker, Mosca, the fast logger Pino and of the Fastify web framework. Matteo is also a member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee. Matteo spoke at several international conferences: Node.js Interactive, NodeConf.eu, NodeSummit, LXJS, Distill by Engine Yard, and JsDay to name a few. He is also co-author of the book Javascript: Best Practices edited by FAG, Milan. In the summer he loves sailing the Sirocco.

  • Workshop 1 (P1) / McCurdy 1 & 2
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

16:00 - 17:30

  • Bluetooth LE, Microcontrollers and Badges by Gordon Williams

    Ever wondered what Bluetooth LE is or how to use it? In this workshop we'll get you communicating with Bluetooth LE devices using your conference badges and Web Bluetooth on your laptop. read more

    You'll learn how to connect to and program an Espruino-based Bluetooth microcontroller, how to scan for and create Bluetooth advertising data, and how to use the Web Bluetooth API to control other Bluetooth devices. You'll be able to write simple apps for your badge, make it communicate with other Bluetooth devices and even make your own Web Bluetooth webpages.

    Preparation: You'll need a Mac with Bluetooth LE and Chrome installed, or a Windows 10 PC with Chrome Canary.

  • Workshop 3 / McCurdy 3
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

16:00 17:00

  • The Node.js Foundation and JS Foundation recently announced an intent to merge. Myles Borins

    A Q&A session will be held onsite at NodeConf EU.

    Myles Borins is a developer, musician, artist, and maker read more

    They work for Google as a developer advocate serving the Node.js ecosystem Myles cares about the open web and healthy communities

  • Discussion/ Maginnes Suite 1, & 3
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

09:00 - 09:25

  • The State of Node.js Core by James Snell

    James M Snell is a core contributor to Node.js and a member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee. He is also an Open Source Architect for nearForm.

    What's the current state of Node.js core? What's new? What's coming? How is the project doing? This talk will dive deep into the project and highlight everything that is happening.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

9.30 - 9.55

  • The Serverless Revolution by Kassandra Perch

    Kas is a Developer Relations Engineer for IOpipe by day, and a nodebotanist by night. She lives in Austin TX with her amazing partner and two cats.

    Okay, wait. Didn't we just spend the better part of a decade convincing everyone that JS belonged on servers?! So what's this serverless nonsense and why does it matter to Node.JS? read more

    The answer involves a dash of microservices, a pinch of scale, and a whole lot of abstraction.

    Follow along as we take a quick but deep dive into the new arena of serverless architectures! Learn the why and how of serverless as we build a small app on stage.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

10:00 - 10:25

  • Healthy and fit wombats for the greater good! by Szabolcs Szabolcsi-Toth

    Senior JS/frontend developer at IBM Cloud Video. Mostly working with a large scale JS codebase or node microservices, focusing on vanilla js, hacking IoT. Organizer of JSConf and CSSConf Budapest.

    Almost every Node.js developer saw the joke of the huge node_modules folder tearing hole in the space-time continuum, but how many thought of what could be done to prevent this? read more

    By fine-tuning our npm publishing workflow, we can save time, bandwidth and money for others, so let’s learn more about it! I’ll shed some light on how the npm module authoring works, and show some best practices on how we do npm authoring at our company.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

10:30 - 10:55

  • Coffee Break

11:00 - 11:25

  • Start your Node.js contribution by writing unit tests quickly with VSCode by Trivikram Kamat

    Trivikram is a Software Developer based in Seattle. He has been working in Web Development for the last 10 years, and started developing with Node.js 3 years ago. read more

    He has been contributing to Node.js (HTTP/2 support) since October 2017, and became Core Collaborator in March 2018. His passion is in testing, performance and improving developer experience.

    Did you always want to contribute to Node.js core, but didn't know where to start? Learn how you can use VSCode launch configs to write unit tests quickly - helping improve test coverage of Node.js core and understanding the module you're writing tests for.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

11:30 - 11:55

  • Node.js Module: I Choose You! by Bethany Griggs

    Software Engineer working in IBM Runtimes since 2016, working on a variety of projects all with a focus on the Node.js runtime. read more

    My work spans from building/testing/contributing to the Open Source Node.js runtime (achieving Collaborator status), to creating a Yeoman.io based generator that scaffolds Cloud Native Node.js applications with integrable services for IBM Cloud.

    With over 600K Node.js modules available on npm, and potentially more than one available to suit your given task - you really can be “spoilt” for choice. read more

    I will discuss considerations you should take into account before you select a Node.js module. From security to stability, I will show you the potential impact that your choice of module has on your project.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

12:00 - 12:25

  • Seeing your Place in a New Way: Utilizing Yarn Package Management in a React SPA Map Viewer by Melissa Auclare

    Melissa Auclaire is a Software Engineer, Game Programmer, Teacher, Educator, and Community Advocate for minorities entering the tech industry. read more

    She has worked in various industry roles, including engineering, quality assurance, technical internships, with seed stage start-ups in advisory roles and as an Software Engineer renewable energy space and has worked and volunteered for and on behalf of several schools and non-profit organizations.

    At present Melissa lives in Kyoto and works as an Engineer at Stroly. She also runs her own stream and developer diary as a side project centered on game development, and creates live Twitch tutorials for the Unity 3d game engine.

    I discuss how Yarn has streamlined the build process for Stroly's Map Viewer technology, and how this has helped us build several features into our map framework, Illustmap. read more

    This will include a discussion of optimizations made to the build process and tiling for hand drawn maps which can display the position of the user in real time.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

12:30 - 12:55

  • Orinoco: The new V8 Garbage Collector by Peter Marshall

    About three years ago we started to work on a new garbage collector for V8, codename Orinoco. Orinoco is a high-performance, low-latency, mostly parallel and concurrent garbage collector. read more

    Instead of developing Orinoco behind a flag, we changed the old V8 garbage collection codebase on the fly and landed its features incrementally to allow developers and users benefit immediately.

    This talk will explain the main Orinoco features, its implementation challenges, and which classes of applications and programming patterns will benefit the most from the new garbage collection architecture.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

13:00 - 14:00

  • Lunch

14:00 15:30

  • Building Collaborative Peer-to-Peer Applications Karissa McKelvey, Stephen Whitemore & Mathias Buus Madsen

    Karissa McKelvey is building an equitable web as an open source software engineer, community facilitator, project manager, and activist. read more

    Formerly a data scientist, her work resulted in multiple peer-reviewed papers and press in outlets such as NPR and the Wall Street Journal. She has led development teams to success with diverse projects in open source, non-profits, and academia.

    Stephen tries to create useful open tools that build the digital commons.

    Mathias Buus is a self taught JavaScript hacker from Copenhagen that has been working with Node.js since the 0.2 days. read more

    Mathias likes to work with P2P and distributed systems and is the author of more than 650 modules on npm. He is also the Chief of Research at Beaker leading the technical work on the Dat protocol.

    This is a joint proposal by Karissa McKelvey (Dat Project), Stephen Whitmore (Digital Democracy), and Mathias Buus-Madsen (Beaker Browser). read more

    Centralization is so 1999! For the past few years, a large open source community has been working on a suite of Node.js libraries for building dynamic and collaborative peer-to-peer applications. These applications are production-ready, and users range from scientists collaborating on datasets to indgienous tribes mapping their territories. These libraries give users the control to fork, modify, and share their data. This software development approach is resilient against surveillance, connectivity failure, and censorship, using concepts from cutting edge computer science research. We've been key players in this ecosystem for many years and are excited to share our knowledge with developers who want to build their own peer-to-peer applications.

    In this three hour workshop, participants will build their own peer-to-peer application either alone or in a small team. We begin with an overview of two libraries: Hypercore, an append-only log; and HyperDB, a key-value store. As a group, we will learn about the APIs used in three example applications: a chat program, a live-streaming video application, and a collaborative spreadsheet. Participants will then have time to experiment with the libraries by building their own application while we walk around, answer questions, and debug prototype implementations. In case participants become stuck, we will offer some sample applications to help people get started as well as pair participants who have similar ideas.

    https://datproject.org
    https://digital-democracy.org
    https://beakerbrowser.com

  • Workshop 1 (P1) / McCurdy 3
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

14:00 - 15:30

  • Code & Learn by Ruben Bridgewater

    Ruben Bridgewater is an open source Node.js hacker. He is a Node.js collaborator and loves performance optimizations with all his heart. read more

    Quite a few improvements that everybody profits from might have come out of his hand. Now he works as a Node.js core developer to improve everybody's user experience and also as a Senior Software Architect at nearForm, where he consults for brands from all over the world.

    Code & Learn events allow you to get started (or go further) with Node.js core contributions. Experienced contributors help guide you through your first (or second or third or fourth) commit to Node.js core. They also are available to provide impromptu guided tours through specific areas of Node.js core source code. read more

  • Workshop 2 (P1) / McCurdy 1 & 2
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

14:00 - 15:30

  • Hands on with Google Cloud Platform by Myles Boris & Chris Wilcox

    Myles Borins is a developer, musician, artist, and maker They work for Google as a developer advocate serving the Node.js ecosystem Myles cares about the open web and healthy communities read more

    Chris is a developer working on the Google Cloud Client Libraries. He has spent his career working on developer tooling and libraries. In Chris' spare time he races motorcycles, hikes, and explores the Seattle brewing scene.

    From App Engine to Kubernetes, CloudSQL to BigQuery, there are no shortage of tools in Google Cloud Platform that can help you bring your ideas to the web.

    read more

    In this workshop we will start with a guided tutorial on how to get your Node.js applications into the cloud with App Engine and then provide a curated set of workshops, all the resources necessary to do them, and team of Googlers to help you successfully complete them. There are no prerequisites aside from the passion to learn.

  • Google Workshop (P2) / Maginnes 1,2 & 3
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

15:30 - 15:55

  • Coffee break

16:00 17:30

  • Building Collaborative Peer-to-Peer Applications Karissa McKelvey, Stephen Whitmore & Mathias Buus Madsen

    Karissa McKelvey is building an equitable web as an open source software engineer, community facilitator, project manager, and activist. read more

    Formerly a data scientist, her work resulted in multiple peer-reviewed papers and press in outlets such as NPR and the Wall Street Journal. She has led development teams to success with diverse projects in open source, non-profits, and academia.

    Stephen tries to create useful open tools that build the digital commons.

    Mathias Buus is a self taught JavaScript hacker from Copenhagen that has been working with Node.js since the 0.2 days. read more

    Mathias likes to work with P2P and distributed systems and is the author of more than 650 modules on npm. He is also the Chief of Research at Beaker leading the technical work on the Dat protocol.

    This is a joint proposal by Karissa McKelvey (Dat Project), Stephen Whitmore (Digital Democracy), and Mathias Buus-Madsen (Beaker Browser). read more

    Centralization is so 1999! For the past few years, a large open source community has been working on a suite of Node.js libraries for building dynamic and collaborative peer-to-peer applications. These applications are production-ready, and users range from scientists collaborating on datasets to indgienous tribes mapping their territories. These libraries give users the control to fork, modify, and share their data. This software development approach is resilient against surveillance, connectivity failure, and censorship, using concepts from cutting edge computer science research. We've been key players in this ecosystem for many years and are excited to share our knowledge with developers who want to build their own peer-to-peer applications.

    In this three hour workshop, participants will build their own peer-to-peer application either alone or in a small team. We begin with an overview of two libraries: Hypercore, an append-only log; and HyperDB, a key-value store. As a group, we will learn about the APIs used in three example applications: a chat program, a live-streaming video application, and a collaborative spreadsheet. Participants will then have time to experiment with the libraries by building their own application while we walk around, answer questions, and debug prototype implementations. In case participants become stuck, we will offer some sample applications to help people get started as well as pair participants who have similar ideas.

    https://datproject.org
    https://digital-democracy.org
    https://beakerbrowser.com

  • Workshop 1 (P2) / McCurdy 3
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

16:00 - 17:30

  • Code & Learn by Ruben Bridgewater

    Ruben Bridgewater is an open source Node.js hacker. He is a Node.js collaborator and loves performance optimizations with all his heart. read more

    Quite a few improvements that everybody profits from might have come out of his hand. Now he works as a Node.js core developer to improve everybody's user experience and also as a Senior Software Architect at nearForm, where he consults for brands from all over the world.

    Code & Learn events allow you to get started (or go further) with Node.js core contributions. Experienced contributors help guide you through your first (or second or third or fourth) commit to Node.js core. They also are available to provide impromptu guided tours through specific areas of Node.js core source code. read more

  • Workshop 2 (P2) / McCurdy 1 & 2
    don’t forget to register here (coming soon)

16:00 - 17:30

  • Hands on with Google Cloud Platform by Myles Boris & Chris Wilcox

    Myles Borins is a developer, musician, artist, and maker They work for Google as a developer advocate serving the Node.js ecosystem Myles cares about the open web and healthy communities read more

    Chris is a developer working on the Google Cloud Client Libraries. He has spent his career working on developer tooling and libraries. In Chris' spare time he races motorcycles, hikes, and explores the Seattle brewing scene.

    From App Engine to Kubernetes, CloudSQL to BigQuery, there are no shortage of tools in Google Cloud Platform that can help you bring your ideas to the web.

    read more

    In this workshop we will start with a guided tutorial on how to get your Node.js applications into the cloud with App Engine and then provide a curated set of workshops, all the resources necessary to do them, and team of Googlers to help you successfully complete them. There are no prerequisites aside from the passion to learn.

  • Google Workshop (P2) / Maginnes 1,2 & 3
    don’t forget to register (coming soon)

09:00 - 09:25

  • Effective Documentation for Open Source Projects by Bryan Hughes

    Bryan Hughes is a technical evangelist at Microsoft and long-time member of the Node.js and NodeBots communities. read more

    Bryan is the creator of Raspi IO which provides Raspberry Pi support for the Johnny-Five JavaScript robotics library. Bryan also created Raver Lights, a distributed wireless lighting system designed for festivals, and Request Inspector, a Node.js performance diagnostics tool. Outside of tech, Bryan is an amateur photographer, occasional writer, a once upon a time pianist, and a wine aficionado.

    Documentation is critical in creating a successful open source project, yet it can be hard to know where to start. How do you organize your docs? read more

    What sections do you need? How much detail should you add? What baseline knowledge can you assume your audience has? This talk will walk you through how and why to document a typical JavaScript module in npm for the browser or Node.js.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

9.30 - 9.55

  • Diagnostic tooling - Be ready when things go wrong in production by Michael Dawson

    Michael Dawson is an active contributor to the Node.js project and chair of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee(TSC). He contributes to a broad range of community efforts including platform support, build infrastructure, N-API, Release, as well as tools to help the community achieve quality with speed (ex: ci jobs, benchmarking and code coverage reporting). read more

    As IBM Node.js community lead, he works with IBM's internal teams to plan and facilitate their contributions to Node.js and v8 within the Node and Google communities.Past experience includes building IBM's Java runtime, building and operating client facing e-commerce applications, building PKI and symmetric based crypto solutions as well as a number of varied consulting engagements. In his spare time, he uses Node.js to automate his home and life for fun.

    Mike Kaufman is a Principal Software Engineer at Microsoft, currently working on the Chakra JavaScript engine and working with the Node.js Diagnostics Working Group. read more

    Mike has a broad software industry perspective informed from over 20 years of experience on highly popular software systems, including developer tools, database systems and hyper-scale public clouds.

    Co-talk with Michael Dawson and Mike Kaufman: Diagnostic tooling is a key component for any successful runtime like Node.js and its importance will only increase as production deployments continue to increase rapidly. read more

    The Node.js community has been working hard on this front over the past years and 2018 is a year even increased focus. Come learn about the key areas identified at the first Diagnostic summit earlier this year, the current efforts that are underway, and progress so far. From initial data capture with Node-report to improved profiling there is a lot to catch up on.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

10.00 - 10.25

  • Commons Host: Building a CDN with Node.js for the rest of the world by Sebastiaan Deckers

    I have been writing JavaScript for 20 years, almost since the language was first created. While I started in picturesque Bruges, Belgium, for most of that time I have lived in bustling Asian cities: Kuala Lumpur, Mumbai, and currently Singapore. read more

    Practically all my work involves FOSS, including the occasional freelance work I do with local tech startups. I help cofound & organise various local tech meetups and conference like FOSS ASIA and SingaporeJS.

    For the past few years I have been working on a side-project that has taken over my life. It has grown from some experiments with SPDY into a full-blown global web hosting & CDN service complete with open hardware edge servers and a Node.js based HTTP/2 stack.

    One of the most interesting challenges has been finding a sustainable financial model, in the innovative & entrepreneurial Singapore context, that allows me to focus 100% on Node.js & FOSS. I hope to achieve success with FOSS & Node.js and inspire others.

    - I will present Commons Host, a static site hosting & CDN service. It is a 100% FOSS product built with new Node.js tools at every layer: core API, edge servers, CLI tooling, frontend bundling, etc. I was fortunate to contribute to the HTTP/2 implementation in Node.js as part of this effort. read more

    Some of the HTTP/2 specific features include:
    - Coalesced Connections: Solving the performance cost of 3rd party content in the browser.
    - Server Push: Using Manifests and Cache Digests to improve resource loading in the browser.
    - Shared Sessions: Proxy content efficiently using interleaved HTTP/2 streams over a shared session. Replaces the legacy HTTP/1 connection pool.

    The story I have to share covers both global and Asia-specific infrastructure shifts, and how I am using Node.js to build for this new environment. Server hardware moving from Intel to ARM. Leapfrogging Asian cities having wide coverage for Gbps FTTH sooner than the West. Deploying Node.js services in widely diverging socio-economic environments.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

10:30 - 10:55

  • Coffee Break

11:00 - 11:25

  • Node.js: The Road to Workers by Anna Henningsen

    Over the last 2 years, Anna has been one of the most active contributors to Node.js core. Currently pursuing a Master’s degree in mathematics in Germany, she is fueled by a passion for Node and its community.

    Workers, and threading support in general, have been one of the most frequently requested features for Node.js over the last years. read more

    Finally, the finishing line is in sight and we’re pretty excited to have experimental support available! This talk will tell you everything around the API, features, use cases & alternatives, our roadmap, and the technical and social challenges that we had to overcome to make it happen!

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

11:30 - 11:55

  • Istio for Node Developers by Luke Holmquist

    Lucas is a Sr. Software Engineer at Red Hat. read more

    Formerly of the Mobile team, where he focused on the mobile web and front-end development, he is now mostly focused on the Node.js developer experience on Openshift.

    While I am not a Node expert, I do pretend to be one at work

    Microservices are a well know pattern now, and a popular choice for enterprise applications, especially using Node. But microservice application development can seem daunting. read more

    How is one supposed to both write an application and also deal with those devOps-y concerns, such as fault tolerance, service-service communication, performance monitoring, tracing and more.

    Say hello to the Istio Service Mesh. Istio makes it easy to deal with these concerns.

    In this talk we will look at Istio from a developers perspective. How do we start using Istio without going down the devOps rabbit hole? How can we add things, like fault-tolerance, to our current applications, without changing our current code? And what exactly is a Mesh?

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

12:00 - 12:25

  • Dashboarding Our Way to the Future by Emma Humphries

    Emma Humphries believes in the healing power of Sleater-Kinney's "Dig Me Out," coffee, hockey, and the Open Web. read more

    For the Mozilla project she helps people file better bugs, helps engineers make decisions on those bugs faster, and tries to make the open source friendlier for underrepresented groups. In her spare time she dances, messes about with tiny computers, cooks, and rides her electric bike. She started working on the Web when she asked the Tiptree Award's Motherboard if she could make a website for them. She still has the original site on a 3.5" disk. She's presented at Open Source Bridge and FOSS-North.

    As Mozilla's Bugmaster, Emma needs to build dashboards and host them without having to stand up her own servers or VMs. read more

    She's found that node and a small kit of tools for prototyping and deployment enable her to be responsive to Mozilla's engineering, release, and program management's need for data on bugs. In this talk Emma covers the problem she needed to solve and how Node and its ecosystem kept her from a development nightmare.

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

12:30 - 12:55

  • Enterprises, node.js and open source, the good, the bad and the ugly. by Paul Savage, Ahmad Nassri & Gordon Suttie.

    Paul, Gordon and Ahmad will discuss 3 different perspectives on node success, including some of the problems and the challenges we face over the coming years.

    read more

  • McCurdy 1 & 2

13:00 - 14:00

  • Lunch

14:00 15:30

  • Getting Started with N-API — A Hands-on Workshop by Gabriel Schulhof, Michael Dawson, Jim Schlight & Nicola Del Gobbo

    Gabriel Schulhof: "I have worked with JavaScript for the past six years, first on the client side as part of the jQuery Mobile development team, and then on the server side as part of the Node.js collaborators where I am part of the API working group." read more

    "I have contributed to the development of Node.js' new ABI-stable, VM-agnostic API dubbed N-API. I am also working on bringing N-API to JerryScript, which is a lightweight JavaScript engine used for resource-constrained devices, such as smartwatches, fitness trackers, and IoT."

    Michael Dawson is an active contributor to the Node.js project and chair of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee(TSC). He contributes to a broad range of community efforts including platform support, build infrastructure, N-API, Release, as well as tools to help the community achieve quality with speed (ex: ci jobs, benchmarking and code coverage reporting). read more

    As IBM Node.js community lead, he works with IBM's internal teams to plan and facilitate their contributions to Node.js and v8 within the Node and Google communities.Past experience includes building IBM's Java runtime, building and operating client facing e-commerce applications, building PKI and symmetric based crypto solutions as well as a number of varied consulting engagements. In his spare time, he uses Node.js to automate his home and life for fun.

    Jim is President of inspiredware, a community-based consultancy located in Ashland, Oregon. With a career spanning over 45 years, Jim has a broad range of experience in the mining, healthcare, library, education, and financial services industries. read less read more

    Jim was a member of the team that developed the first AI-based hospital information system. He later went on to develop the first entirely web-based school visitor and volunteer management system. More recently Jim has been a contributing member of N-API Working Group. Jim has a passion for solving problems and is particularly interested in promoting the adoption of JavaScript in the scientific and engineering communities. Outside of technical pursuits Jim enjoys travel and the cultural and recreational opportunities offered closer to home in Southern Oregon.

    Nicola del Gobbo: "I'm very passionate about developing web & mobile application. I started my developer career as Java and PHP developer but in 2013 i discovered Node.js and i fell in love with JavaScript." read more

    Now I'm a full stack JavaScript developer and I try to give my contribute to all technologies that I use everyday. I love to share my knowledge so I write technical article. I was a Co-Founder of Nacios Technologies and now I work as a developer at Packly. My real happiness consists in resolving very difficult problems with simplicity and sometimes take a long walk."

    Ready to get your hands dirty with N-API, Node's new ABI-stable native add-on API? Don't miss this workshop. read more

    Whether you're maintaining a NAN module, looking to start a new add-on using N-API, or are interested in porting existing native add-ons to N-API, we're here to get you started right. After a brief introduction you'll have the chance to work through a tutorial or bring your project and N-API experts will be available to help you through any issues. You'll leave with a solid understanding N-API and the tools available to help you best succeed.

  • Workshop 1 (P1) / McCurdy 1 & 2
    don’t forget to register here (coming soon)

14:00 - 15:30

  • When Kubernetes is MEAN (or MERN) by Bethany Griggs & Adam Roberts

    Bethany Griggs is a Software Engineer working in IBM Runtimes since 2016, working on a variety of projects all with a focus on the Node.js runtime. read more

    My work spans from building/testing/contributing to the Open Source Node.js runtime (achieving Collaborator status), to creating a Yeoman.io based generator that scaffolds Cloud Native Node.js applications with integrable services for IBM Cloud.

    Adam currently works on IBM's Microclimate offering and has previously worked in the Node.js team, the Apache Spark team as a contributor, tester, bug fixer, and demoer, and in the IBM Java team delivering a GPU enabled class library. read more

    He has experience working with some of IBM's largest customers, loves to write Go and Scala code, and to help others achieve their goals. The Microclimate offering involves extensive work with Kubernetes, Helm charts, Minikube and Docker at an advanced level.

    Kubernetes is everywhere. We want to arm you with the minimum knowledge and tools necessary to get your MEAN (or MERN) application running in a Kubernetes cluster; enabling scalability, fault tolerance, and enhancing reliability. read more

    We’ll provide code samples, and let you know any tips and tricks we’ve learned. This session is aimed at full-stack Node.js developers who have heard the hype surrounding Kubernetes and are now ready to try it, whether that be on a laptop or in a cloud environment.

  • Workshop 2 / McCurdy 3
    don’t forget to register here (coming soon)

14:00 - 15:30

  • Build Scalable APIs using GraphQL and Serverless by Simona Cotin

    Simona Cotin is a web developer with a passion for teaching. She spends most of her time tinkering with JavaScript in the cloud and sharing her experience with other developers at community events like meetups and conferences or online. read more

    As a Cloud Developer Advocate, Simona engages with the web community to help create a great developer experience with Azure. She loves shipping code to production and has built network data analytics platforms using Angular, Typescript, React, and Nodejs.

    Current trends in software and backend architecture have been evolving towards a more loosely coupled more granular design. I am sure most of you have heard of microservice based architectures. read more

    The latest development on that front in the past couple of years has been the advent of serverless which allows you to run applications in very cost effective ephemeral services.

    This is why it is important to have a proper gateway for your API that is able to route all your requests to the designated endpoint. GraphQL stands out in that respect as being a mature open sourced standard started at Facebook.

    We will first have a look at how we set up our own GraphQL server locally, then we will explore the Query language and schema definitions it provides which allows you essentially query your mesh of services from a single point of entry. The beauty of that is it will notify you early if any of your endpoints is misbehaving or the schemas are out of date by erroring out.

    Another advantage of this is that it allows for your API documentation to be a real time process and it will give you what one may call an API playground where you can query and explore your API.

    After we explore our serverless API we will have a look at the more advanced features and standards around mutators and resolvers and then we will close by going all in, full serverless and deploy our graphql server to a function in the cloud.

  • Microsoft workshop (P1) / Maginnes Suite 1,2 & 3
    don’t forget to register here (coming soon)

15:30 - 15:55

  • Coffee break

16:00 17:30

  • Getting Started with N-API — A Hands-on Workshop by Gabriel Schulhof, Michael Dawson, Jim Schlight & Nicola Del Gobbo

    Gabriel Schulhof: "I have worked with JavaScript for the past six years, first on the client side as part of the jQuery Mobile development team, and then on the server side as part of the Node.js collaborators where I am part of the API working group." read more

    "I have contributed to the development of Node.js' new ABI-stable, VM-agnostic API dubbed N-API. I am also working on bringing N-API to JerryScript, which is a lightweight JavaScript engine used for resource-constrained devices, such as smartwatches, fitness trackers, and IoT."

    Michael Dawson is an active contributor to the Node.js project and chair of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee(TSC). He contributes to a broad range of community efforts including platform support, build infrastructure, N-API, Release, as well as tools to help the community achieve quality with speed (ex: ci jobs, benchmarking and code coverage reporting). read more

    As IBM Node.js community lead, he works with IBM's internal teams to plan and facilitate their contributions to Node.js and v8 within the Node and Google communities.Past experience includes building IBM's Java runtime, building and operating client facing e-commerce applications, building PKI and symmetric based crypto solutions as well as a number of varied consulting engagements. In his spare time, he uses Node.js to automate his home and life for fun.

    Jim is President of inspiredware, a community-based consultancy located in Ashland, Oregon. With a career spanning over 45 years, Jim has a broad range of experience in the mining, healthcare, library, education, and financial services industries. read less read more

    Jim was a member of the team that developed the first AI-based hospital information system. He later went on to develop the first entirely web-based school visitor and volunteer management system. More recently Jim has been a contributing member of N-API Working Group. Jim has a passion for solving problems and is particularly interested in promoting the adoption of JavaScript in the scientific and engineering communities. Outside of technical pursuits Jim enjoys travel and the cultural and recreational opportunities offered closer to home in Southern Oregon.

    Nicola del Gobbo: "I'm very passionate about developing web & mobile application. I started my developer career as Java and PHP developer but in 2013 i discovered Node.js and i fell in love with JavaScript." read more

    "Now I'm a full stack JavaScript developer and I try to give my contribute to all technologies that I use everyday. I love to share my knowledge so I write technical article. I was a Co-Founder of Nacios Technologies and now I work as a developer at Packly. My real happiness consists in resolving very difficult problems with simplicity and sometimes take a long walk."

    Ready to get your hands dirty with N-API, Node's new ABI-stable native add-on API? Don't miss this workshop. read more

    Whether you're maintaining a NAN module, looking to start a new add-on using N-API, or are interested in porting existing native add-ons to N-API, we're here to get you started right. After a brief introduction you'll have the chance to work through a tutorial or bring your project and N-API experts will be available to help you through any issues. You'll leave with a solid understanding N-API and the tools available to help you best succeed.

  • Worshop 1 (P2) / McCurdy 1 & 2
    don’t forget to register here (coming soon)

16:00 - 17:30

  • Handcrafting WebAssembly by Emil Bay

    Emil Bay is a independent consultant from Copenhagen, Denmark. He used to study maths, but quickly dropped out to work on software. He has worked at a biomedical instrument lab, HPC lab, an agency and a newspaper, as a data journalist. read more

    He currently works on making cryptography and security primitives more accessible.

    There has been many talks about what WebAssembly (WASM) is, it’s relation to compilers and how bright our collective future is with WASM in our toolbox. However most talks treat WebAssembly as a semi-opaque box, and mostly as something you can compile higher level languages into. This is a pity! read more

    WebAssembly is a fun language to learn, and allows one to write code often less than a magnitude slower than C!

    In this talk I will show how to write WAT (WebAssembly Text-format), how to reason about algorithms when all you have is one large slab of memory, how to convert high level constructs such as loops into elementary instructions and how to have fun at the same time! We will convert a number of progressively harder algorithms, each revealing a challenging aspect of working with no abstractions.

    Even if you will not write WASM at work, learning at the lowest level of computer tears away the enchantment that abstractions cause, and reveals unique challenges but also surgical precision.

    For the workshop I will teach how to implement the statistical algorithm K-means, which for the workshop will be used for finding primary colours in images and compressing the colour palette. The workshop will cover implementation, compiling, editor tooling, debugging and deployment for both browsers and Node.js.

  • Workshop 3 / McCurdy 3
    don’t forget to register here (coming soon)

Speakers 2018

Holding on to your Performance Promises

Maya is passionate about C++ and JavaScript, striving to explain complex concepts in a simple way. She comes from teaching and game development background and recently joined the JavaScript Foundations team at Google to work on asynchrony in V8.

The ES2015 revision of JavaScript introduced Promises as primitives for asynchronous operations and generators as primitives for concurrent programming. read more

On top of that ES2017/18 added async functions and generators. This talk briefly explores these primitives, and dives into the performance peculiarities of Promises-based programming paradigms. We’ll especially look into how these operations perform in V8, the JavaScript engine that powers both Node.js and Chrome.

Holding on to your Performance Promises

Benedikt is a JavaScript compiler engineer who loves to tinker with different aspects of programming languages. At Google he is working on the V8 JavaScript engine that powers both Node.js and Chrome, and he is currently leading the Node.js Performance Effort.

The ES2015 revision of JavaScript introduced Promises as primitives for asynchronous operations and generators as primitives for concurrent programming. read more

On top of that ES2017/18 added async functions and generators. This talk briefly explores these primitives, and dives into the performance peculiarities of Promises-based programming paradigms. We’ll especially look into how these operations perform in V8, the JavaScript engine that powers both Node.js and Chrome.

Healthy and fit wombats for the greater good!

Senior JS/frontend developer at IBM Cloud Video. Mostly working with a large scale JS codebase or node microservices, focusing on vanilla js, hacking IoT. Organizer of JSConf and CSSConf Budapest.

Almost every Node.js developer saw the joke of the huge node_modules folder tearing hole in the space-time continuum, but how many thought of what could be done to prevent this? read more

By fine-tuning our npm publishing workflow, we can save time, bandwidth and money for others, so let’s learn more about it! I’ll shed some light on how the npm module authoring works, and show some best practices on how we do npm authoring at our company.

The Serverless Revolution

Kas is a Developer Relations Engineer for IOpipe by day, and a nodebotanist by night. She lives in Austin TX with her amazing partner and two cats.

Okay, wait. Didn't we just spend the better part of a decade convincing everyone that JS belonged on servers?! So what's this serverless nonsense and why does it matter to Node.JS? read more

The answer involves a dash of microservices, a pinch of scale, and a whole lot of abstraction.

Follow along as we take a quick but deep dive into the new arena of serverless architectures! Learn the why and how of serverless as we build a small app on stage.

Commons Host: Building a CDN with Node.js for the rest of the world

I have been writing JavaScript for 20 years, almost since the language was first created. While I started in picturesque Bruges, Belgium, for most of that time I have lived in bustling Asian cities: Kuala Lumpur, Mumbai, and currently Singapore. read more

Practically all my work involves FOSS, including the occasional freelance work I do with local tech startups. I help cofound & organise various local tech meetups and conference like FOSS ASIA and SingaporeJS.

For the past few years I have been working on a side-project that has taken over my life. It has grown from some experiments with SPDY into a full-blown global web hosting & CDN service complete with open hardware edge servers and a Node.js based HTTP/2 stack.

One of the most interesting challenges has been finding a sustainable financial model, in the innovative & entrepreneurial Singapore context, that allows me to focus 100% on Node.js & FOSS. I hope to achieve success with FOSS & Node.js and inspire others.

- I will present Commons Host, a static site hosting & CDN service. It is a 100% FOSS product built with new Node.js tools at every layer: core API, edge servers, CLI tooling, frontend bundling, etc. I was fortunate to contribute to the HTTP/2 implementation in Node.js as part of this effort. read more

Some of the HTTP/2 specific features include:
- Coalesced Connections: Solving the performance cost of 3rd party content in the browser.
- Server Push: Using Manifests and Cache Digests to improve resource loading in the browser.
- Shared Sessions: Proxy content efficiently using interleaved HTTP/2 streams over a shared session. Replaces the legacy HTTP/1 connection pool.

The story I have to share covers both global and Asia-specific infrastructure shifts, and how I am using Node.js to build for this new environment. Server hardware moving from Intel to ARM. Leapfrogging Asian cities having wide coverage for Gbps FTTH sooner than the West. Deploying Node.js services in widely diverging socio-economic environments.

Predicting the Internet of Things with Tensorflow.js

Taron Foxworth wants to translate technology for people to learn, love, and be inspired. Taron is the Lead Technical Evangelist at Losant and an adjunct professor at Xavier University. Taron was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, then relocated to Cincinnati, Ohio. Taron is currently interested in all things food and whiskey, IoT, Blockchain, Node.js, buzz words, and other really random things.

I wondered, can I use JavaScript to predict if a machine will fail? With Tensorflow.js, some sensors, and a little elbow grease, this is totally possible. read more

As the price of Internet-connected chips drops, it is now possible to connect anything – literally anything – to the Internet. But we're generating so much data off of these devices that we need some help making sense of it all. Enter machine learning. This talk is an introduction to machine learning – what it is (and is not!), how it is beneficial, and how you as a JS developer can start learning. We'll cover the basics of building a model and using Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), and use these skills to predict machine failure. JavaScript developers can use their skills to program the web, build cloud-based applications, develop games and robotics – and now, with Tensorflow.js, you can add machine learning to your repertoire.

Build the API you want to see in the world

Three years ago I learned to code. Now I'm a Software Engineer at Condé Nast International in London, writing JS with React and Node. I also organise Node Girls London, which hosts free JavaScript workshops for gender minorities in tech.

Have you ever used a third party API, and hated it? You don't have to live with it! I'll be sharing my experience transforming ugly JSON into the GraphQL API of my dreams. read more

I'll speak about how GraphQL helped me get the data I wanted, and share some strategies for designing schema you'll love. By the end of this talk, you'll understand how GraphQL can improve the quality of your data, and life.

Hands on with Google Cloud Platform

Myles Borins is a developer, musician, artist, and maker They work for Google as a developer advocate serving the Node.js ecosystem Myles cares about the open web and healthy communities

Diagnostic tooling - Be ready when things go wrong in production

Michael Dawson is an active contributor to the Node.js project and chair of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee(TSC). He contributes to a broad range of community efforts including platform support, build infrastructure, N-API, Release, as well as tools to help the community achieve quality with speed (ex: ci jobs, benchmarking and code coverage reporting). read more

As IBM Node.js community lead, he works with IBM's internal teams to plan and facilitate their contributions to Node.js and v8 within the Node and Google communities.Past experience includes building IBM's Java runtime, building and operating client facing e-commerce applications, building PKI and symmetric based crypto solutions as well as a number of varied consulting engagements. In his spare time, he uses Node.js to automate his home and life for fun.

Co-talk with Michael Dawson and Mike Kaufman: Diagnostic tooling is a key component for any successful runtime like Node.js and its importance will only increase as production deployments continue to increase rapidly. read more

The Node.js community has been working hard on this front over the past years and 2018 is a year even increased focus. Come learn about the key areas identified at the first Diagnostic summit earlier this year, the current efforts that are underway, and progress so far. From initial data capture with Node-report to improved profiling there is a lot to catch up on.

Hands on with Google Cloud Platform

Chris is a developer working on the Google Cloud Client Libraries. He has spent his career working on developer tooling and libraries. In Chris' spare time he races motorcycles, hikes, and explores the Seattle brewing scene.

OK Google, how to build a Node.js transactional application on Google Assistant from A to Z?

After 3 years as web developer in KRDS India social media agency, Marie moved back to KRDS Paris in 2014 as technical consultant (still 1/3 of the time in India). read more

She is now enjoying life full time in Paris as OhMyBot! CTO, building Yelda.ai chatbots and assistants management platform and sometime mentoring Node.js learners in NodeSchool Paris events !

Many of us already had conversations with simple chatbots or assistants, but how would you design, develop, deploy and monitor a conversational application with payments? read more

This winter I was fortunate enough to develop the first French transactional Google Assistant application for a big French retailer. From this experience, this workshop will walk through developing a small NodeJS transactional chatbot on Google Assistant with the help of DialogFlow and Google Actions SDK, and deploying it on Google Firebase serverless hosting and database.

The State of Node.js Core

James M Snell is a core contributor to Node.js and a member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee. He is also an Open Source Architect for nearForm.

What's the current state of Node.js core? What's new? What's coming? How is the project doing? This talk will dive deep into the project and highlight everything that is happening.

Building Collaborative Peer-to-Peer Applications

Karissa McKelvey is building an equitable web as an open source software engineer, community facilitator, project manager, and activist. read more

Formerly a data scientist, her work resulted in multiple peer-reviewed papers and press in outlets such as NPR and the Wall Street Journal. She has led development teams to success with diverse projects in open source, non-profits, and academia.

This is a joint proposal by Karissa McKelvey (Dat Project), Stephen Whitmore (Digital Democracy), and Mathias Buus-Madsen (Beaker Browser). read more

Centralization is so 1999! For the past few years, a large open source community has been working on a suite of Node.js libraries for building dynamic and collaborative peer-to-peer applications. These applications are production-ready, and users range from scientists collaborating on datasets to indgienous tribes mapping their territories. These libraries give users the control to fork, modify, and share their data. This software development approach is resilient against surveillance, connectivity failure, and censorship, using concepts from cutting edge computer science research. We've been key players in this ecosystem for many years and are excited to share our knowledge with developers who want to build their own peer-to-peer applications.

In this three hour workshop, participants will build their own peer-to-peer application either alone or in a small team. We begin with an overview of two libraries: Hypercore, an append-only log; and HyperDB, a key-value store. As a group, we will learn about the APIs used in three example applications: a chat program, a live-streaming video application, and a collaborative spreadsheet. Participants will then have time to experiment with the libraries by building their own application while we walk around, answer questions, and debug prototype implementations. In case participants become stuck, we will offer some sample applications to help people get started as well as pair participants who have similar ideas.

https://datproject.org
https://digital-democracy.org
https://beakerbrowser.com

Building Collaborative Peer-to-Peer Applications

Stephen tries to create useful open tools that build the digital commons.

This is a joint proposal by Karissa McKelvey (Dat Project), Stephen Whitmore (Digital Democracy), and Mathias Buus-Madsen (Beaker Browser). read more

Centralization is so 1999! For the past few years, a large open source community has been working on a suite of Node.js libraries for building dynamic and collaborative peer-to-peer applications. These applications are production-ready, and users range from scientists collaborating on datasets to indgienous tribes mapping their territories. These libraries give users the control to fork, modify, and share their data. This software development approach is resilient against surveillance, connectivity failure, and censorship, using concepts from cutting edge computer science research. We've been key players in this ecosystem for many years and are excited to share our knowledge with developers who want to build their own peer-to-peer applications.

In this three hour workshop, participants will build their own peer-to-peer application either alone or in a small team. We begin with an overview of two libraries: Hypercore, an append-only log; and HyperDB, a key-value store. As a group, we will learn about the APIs used in three example applications: a chat program, a live-streaming video application, and a collaborative spreadsheet. Participants will then have time to experiment with the libraries by building their own application while we walk around, answer questions, and debug prototype implementations. In case participants become stuck, we will offer some sample applications to help people get started as well as pair participants who have similar ideas.

https://datproject.org
https://digital-democracy.org
https://beakerbrowser.com

Building Collaborative Peer-to-Peer Applications

Mathias Buus is a self taught JavaScript hacker from Copenhagen that has been working with Node.js since the 0.2 days. read more

Mathias likes to work with P2P and distributed systems and is the author of more than 650 modules on npm. He is also the Chief of Research at Beaker leading the technical work on the Dat protocol.

This is a joint proposal by Karissa McKelvey (Dat Project), Stephen Whitmore (Digital Democracy), and Mathias Buus-Madsen (Beaker Browser). read more

Centralization is so 1999! For the past few years, a large open source community has been working on a suite of Node.js libraries for building dynamic and collaborative peer-to-peer applications. These applications are production-ready, and users range from scientists collaborating on datasets to indgienous tribes mapping their territories. These libraries give users the control to fork, modify, and share their data. This software development approach is resilient against surveillance, connectivity failure, and censorship, using concepts from cutting edge computer science research. We've been key players in this ecosystem for many years and are excited to share our knowledge with developers who want to build their own peer-to-peer applications.

In this three hour workshop, participants will build their own peer-to-peer application either alone or in a small team. We begin with an overview of two libraries: Hypercore, an append-only log; and HyperDB, a key-value store. As a group, we will learn about the APIs used in three example applications: a chat program, a live-streaming video application, and a collaborative spreadsheet. Participants will then have time to experiment with the libraries by building their own application while we walk around, answer questions, and debug prototype implementations. In case participants become stuck, we will offer some sample applications to help people get started as well as pair participants who have similar ideas.

https://datproject.org
https://digital-democracy.org
https://beakerbrowser.com

Dashboarding Our Way to the Future

Emma Humphries believes in the healing power of Sleater-Kinney's "Dig Me Out," coffee, hockey, and the Open Web. read more

For the Mozilla project she helps people file better bugs, helps engineers make decisions on those bugs faster, and tries to make the open source friendlier for underrepresented groups. In her spare time she dances, messes about with tiny computers, cooks, and rides her electric bike. She started working on the Web when she asked the Tiptree Award's Motherboard if she could make a website for them. She still has the original site on a 3.5" disk. She's presented at Open Source Bridge and FOSS-North.

As Mozilla's Bugmaster, Emma needs to build dashboards and host them without having to stand up her own servers or VMs. read more

She's found that node and a small kit of tools for prototyping and deployment enable her to be responsive to Mozilla's engineering, release, and program management's need for data on bugs. In this talk Emma covers the problem she needed to solve and how Node and its ecosystem kept her from a development nightmare.

A New Way To Profile Async Activity In Node.js

Mathias Buus is a self taught JavaScript hacker from Copenhagen that has been working with Node.js since the 0.2 days. read more

Mathias likes to work with P2P and distributed systems and is the author of more than 650 modules on npm. He is also the Chief of Research at Beaker leading the technical work on the Dat protocol.

Node works best in heavily-I/O-related contexts, and often acts as a mediator between many data streams and interfaces. Due to JavaScript’s evented nature, most I/O is performed asynchronously. read more

Especially when our Node process is a networked application. If we can measure asynchronous activity in a decoupled way, we can find out where an application is waiting.

This means we can diagnose I/O problems in external infrastructure! This workshop introduced a innovative visualization tool that diagnoses various infrastructural and architectural issues.

Attendees will learn the following:

* How to identify and reduce latency in your servers
* Finding and fixing significant asynchronous bottlenecks
* Using Node.js to identify problems in your server architecture
* How to debug asynchronous behavior
* When (and how) to use development profiling vs APM-based production profiling

Code & Learn

Ruben Bridgewater is an open source Node.js hacker. He is a Node.js collaborator and loves performance optimizations with all his heart. read more

Quite a few improvements that everybody profits from might have come out of his hand. Now he works as a Node.js core developer to improve everybody's user experience and also as a Senior Software Architect at nearForm, where he consults for brands from all over the world.

Code & Learn events allow you to get started (or go further) with Node.js core contributions. read more

Experienced contributors help guide you through your first (or second or third or fourth) commit to Node.js core. They also are available to provide impromptu guided tours through specific areas of Node.js core source code.

Node ES Modules - something almost, but not quite entirely unlike CommonJS

30 years of experience have not dulled the fascination Gil Tayar has with software development. From the olden days of DOS, to the contemporary world of Software Testing, Gil was, is, and always will be, a software developer. He has in the past co-founded WebCollage, survived the bubble collapse of 2000, and worked on various big cloudy projects at Wix. read more

His current passion is figuring out how to test software, a passion which he has turned into his main job as Evangelist and Senior Architect at Applitools. He has religiously tested all his software, from the early days as a junior software developer to the current days at Applitools, where he develops tests for software that tests software, which is almost one meta layer too many for him.

In his private life, he is a dad to two lovely kids (and a cat), an avid reader of Science Fiction, (he counts Samuel Delany, Robert Silverberg, and Robert Heinlein as favorites) and a passionate film buff. (Stanley Kubrick, Lars Von Trier, David Cronenberg, anybody?)

Unfortunately for him, he hasn’t really answered the big question of his life - he still doesn't know whether static languages or dynamic languages are best.

CommonJS, along with the npm registry, has become the de-facto standard in Frontend and NodeJS development today. But Native ES Modules are coming to NodeJS and the browser. read more

On the surface, they look incredibly similar to CommonJS modules, but the differences are important. In this talk I will describe these differences, the consequences of these differences, and how to start preparing for the new world of Native ES Modules.

Why is this talk important? Because Native ES Modules _are_ coming. And everybody will be talking about them in 2019. And we need to be prepared, for it _is_ going to be a difficult transition, because the differences are subtle and they bite.

Start your Node.js contribution by writing unit tests quickly with VSCode

Trivikram is a Software Developer based in Seattle. He has been working in Web Development for the last 10 years, and started developing with Node.js 3 years ago. read more

He has been contributing to Node.js (HTTP/2 support) since October 2017, and became Core Collaborator in March 2018. His passion is in testing, performance and improving developer experience.

Did you always want to contribute to Node.js core, but didn't know where to start? Learn how you can use VSCode launch configs to write unit tests quickly - helping improve test coverage of Node.js core and understanding the module you're writing tests for.

Going FaaSter: Function as a Service at Netflix

Yunong is a principal software engineer at Netflix in Los Gatos, CA. He currently leads the design and architecture of the Netflix API Platform. read more

He spent stints of his career at AWS and Joyent, where he worked on distributed systems and helped to shape and build several cloud computing products such as AWS IAM and Manta. He also maintains the open source Node.js framework restify. Yunong received a BaSc with honours in Computer Engineering from the University of Waterloo.

The FaaS revolution is taking the world by storm. It just so happens that JavaScript has become the lingua franca of the FaaS revolution. read more

Customers love the no-ops and ergonomics of this new paradigm. They enable a revolution in developer velocity, allowing engineers to deploy code to production much faster than before.

At Netflix, these features are a perfect fit for the Netflix API Platform, which provides engineers the ability to write and deploy tier-1 services using JS without having to manage infrastructure or operations.

However, there are trade-offs to consider. Most FaaS offerings today are great for latency insensitive tasks, but not for fully fledged services that need to be isolated, low latency, reliable, and elastically scalable.

Learn about the architecture and internals of Netflix’s JS FaaS platform, which lets engineers deploy JS functions as isolated, reliable, and low latency production services.

Handcrafting WebAssembly

Emil Bay is a independent consultant from Copenhagen, Denmark. He used to study maths, but quickly dropped out to work on software. He has worked at a biomedical instrument lab, HPC lab, an agency and a newspaper, as a data journalist. read more

He currently works on making cryptography and security primitives more accessible.

There has been many talks about what WebAssembly (WASM) is, it’s relation to compilers and how bright our collective future is with WASM in our toolbox. However most talks treat WebAssembly as a semi-opaque box, and mostly as something you can compile higher level languages into. This is a pity! read more

WebAssembly is a fun language to learn, and allows one to write code often less than a magnitude slower than C!

In this talk I will show how to write WAT (WebAssembly Text-format), how to reason about algorithms when all you have is one large slab of memory, how to convert high level constructs such as loops into elementary instructions and how to have fun at the same time! We will convert a number of progressively harder algorithms, each revealing a challenging aspect of working with no abstractions.

Even if you will not write WASM at work, learning at the lowest level of computer tears away the enchantment that abstractions cause, and reveals unique challenges but also surgical precision.

For the workshop I will teach how to implement the statistical algorithm K-means, which for the workshop will be used for finding primary colours in images and compressing the colour palette. The workshop will cover implementation, compiling, editor tooling, debugging and deployment for both browsers and Node.js.

Let's build a doppelganger game!

Simona is a web developer with experience in building enterprise data visualization tools using Angular and more recently building apps in the cloud. read more

Communities power her up and that’s why she is co-organising the London Javascript and Angular Dublin meetups. Passionate about knowledge sharing, she has mentored at workshops for Women Who Code and NgGirls encouraging women to learn more about programming.

You’ve always thought you looked like Marty McFly but your friends say you look like Yoda, take the 80s doppleganger challenge and find out for sure! read more

In this talk, I’ll show how to use a little bit of machine learning and serverless tech to build an application that can match faces to their dopplegangers. All written with Angular and Node!

Getting Started with N-API — A Hands-on Workshop

I have worked with JavaScript for the past six years, first on the client side as part of the jQuery Mobile development team, and then on the server side as part of the Node.js collaborators where I am part of the API working group. read more

I have contributed to the development of Node.js' new ABI-stable, VM-agnostic API dubbed N-API. I am also working on bringing N-API to JerryScript, which is a lightweight JavaScript engine used for resource-constrained devices, such as smartwatches, fitness trackers, and IoT.

Ready to get your hands dirty with N-API, Node's new ABI-stable native add-on API? Don't miss this workshop. read more

Whether you're maintaining a NAN module, looking to start a new add-on using N-API, or are interested in porting existing native add-ons to N-API, we're here to get you started right. After a brief introduction you'll have the chance to work through a tutorial or bring your project and N-API experts will be available to help you through any issues. You'll leave with a solid understanding N-API and the tools available to help you best succeed.

Getting Started with N-API — A Hands-on Workshop

Michael Dawson is an active contributor to the Node.js project and chair of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee(TSC). He contributes to a broad range of community efforts including platform support, build infrastructure, N-API, Release, as well as tools to help the community achieve quality with speed (ex: ci jobs, benchmarking and code coverage reporting). read more

As IBM Node.js community lead, he works with IBM's internal teams to plan and facilitate their contributions to Node.js and v8 within the Node and Google communities.Past experience includes building IBM's Java runtime, building and operating client facing e-commerce applications, building PKI and symmetric based crypto solutions as well as a number of varied consulting engagements. In his spare time, he uses Node.js to automate his home and life for fun.

Ready to get your hands dirty with N-API, Node's new ABI-stable native add-on API? Don't miss this workshop. read more

Whether you're maintaining a NAN module, looking to start a new add-on using N-API, or are interested in porting existing native add-ons to N-API, we're here to get you started right. After a brief introduction you'll have the chance to work through a tutorial or bring your project and N-API experts will be available to help you through any issues. You'll leave with a solid understanding N-API and the tools available to help you best succeed.

Getting Started with N-API — A Hands-on Workshop

I'm very passionate about developing web & mobile application. I started my developer career as Java and PHP developer but in 2013 i discovered Node.js and i fell in love with JavaScript. read more

Now I'm a full stack JavaScript developer and I try to give my contribute to all technologies that I use everyday. I love to share my knowledge so I write technical article. I was a Co-Founder of Nacios Technologies and now I work as a developer at Packly. My real happiness consists in resolving very difficult problems with simplicity and sometimes take a long walk.

Ready to get your hands dirty with N-API, Node's new ABI-stable native add-on API? Don't miss this workshop. read more

Whether you're maintaining a NAN module, looking to start a new add-on using N-API, or are interested in porting existing native add-ons to N-API, we're here to get you started right. After a brief introduction you'll have the chance to work through a tutorial or bring your project and N-API experts will be available to help you through any issues. You'll leave with a solid understanding N-API and the tools available to help you best succeed.

Getting Started with N-API — A Hands-on Workshop

Jim is President of inspiredware, a community-based consultancy located in Ashland, Oregon. With a career spanning over 45 years, Jim has a broad range of experience in the mining, healthcare, library, education, and financial services industries. read more

Jim was a member of the team that developed the first AI-based hospital information system. He later went on to develop the first entirely web-based school visitor and volunteer management system. More recently Jim has been a contributing member of N-API Working Group. Jim has a passion for solving problems and is particularly interested in promoting the adoption of JavaScript in the scientific and engineering communities. Outside of technical pursuits Jim enjoys travel and the cultural and recreational opportunities offered closer to home in Southern Oregon.

Ready to get your hands dirty with N-API, Node's new ABI-stable native add-on API? Don't miss this workshop. read more

Whether you're maintaining a NAN module, looking to start a new add-on using N-API, or are interested in porting existing native add-ons to N-API, we're here to get you started right. After a brief introduction you'll have the chance to work through a tutorial or bring your project and N-API experts will be available to help you through any issues. You'll leave with a solid understanding N-API and the tools available to help you best succeed.

Conference MC

Effective Documentation for Open Source Projects

Bryan Hughes is a technical evangelist at Microsoft and long-time member of the Node.js and NodeBots communities. Bryan is the creator of Raspi IO which provides Raspberry Pi support for the Johnny-Five JavaScript robotics library. read more

Bryan also created Raver Lights, a distributed wireless lighting system designed for festivals, and Request Inspector, a Node.js performance diagnostics tool. Outside of tech, Bryan is an amateur photographer, occasional writer, a once upon a time pianist, and a wine aficionado.

Documentation is critical in creating a successful open source project, yet it can be hard to know where to start. read more

How do you organize your docs? What sections do you need? How much detail should you add? What baseline knowledge can you assume your audience has? This talk will walk you through how and why to document a typical JavaScript module in npm for the browser or Node.js.

Seeing your Place in a New Way: Utilizing Yarn Package Management in a React SPA Map Viewer

Melissa Auclaire is a Software Engineer, Game Programmer, Teacher, Educator, and Community Advocate for minorities entering the tech industry. read more

She has worked in various industry roles, including engineering, quality assurance, technical internships, with seed stage start-ups in advisory roles and as an Software Engineer renewable energy space and has worked and volunteered for and on behalf of several schools and non-profit organizations.

At present Melissa lives in Kyoto and works as an Engineer at Stroly. She also runs her own stream and developer diary as a side project centered on game development, and creates live Twitch tutorials for the Unity 3d game engine.

I discuss how Yarn has streamlined the build process for Stroly's Map Viewer technology, and how this has helped us build several features into our map framework, Illustmap. read more

This will include a discussion of optimizations made to the build process and tiling for hand drawn maps which can display the position of the user in real time.

Node.js Module: I Choose You!

Software Engineer working in IBM Runtimes since 2016, working on a variety of projects all with a focus on the Node.js runtime. read more

My work spans from building/testing/contributing to the Open Source Node.js runtime (achieving Collaborator status), to creating a Yeoman.io based generator that scaffolds Cloud Native Node.js applications with integrable services for IBM Cloud.

With over 600K Node.js modules available on npm, and potentially more than one available to suit your given task - you really can be “spoilt” for choice. read more

I will discuss considerations you should take into account before you select a Node.js module. From security to stability, I will show you the potential impact that your choice of module has on your project.

When Kubernetes is MEAN (or MERN)

Software Engineer working in IBM Runtimes since 2016, working on a variety of projects all with a focus on the Node.js runtime. read more

My work spans from building/testing/contributing to the Open Source Node.js runtime (achieving Collaborator status), to creating a Yeoman.io based generator that scaffolds Cloud Native Node.js applications with integrable services for IBM Cloud.

Kubernetes is everywhere. We want to arm you with the minimum knowledge and tools necessary to get your MEAN (or MERN) application running in a Kubernetes cluster; enabling scalability, fault tolerance, and enhancing reliability. read more

We’ll provide code samples, and let you know any tips and tricks we’ve learned. This session is aimed at full-stack Node.js developers who have heard the hype surrounding Kubernetes and are now ready to try it, whether that be on a laptop or in a cloud environment.

When Kubernetes is MEAN (or MERN)

Adam currently works on IBM's Microclimate offering and has previously worked in the Node.js team, the Apache Spark team as a contributor, tester, bug fixer, and demoer, and in the IBM Java team delivering a GPU enabled class library. read more

He has experience working with some of IBM's largest customers, loves to write Go and Scala code, and to help others achieve their goals. The Microclimate offering involves extensive work with Kubernetes, Helm charts, Minikube and Docker at an advanced level.

Kubernetes is everywhere. We want to arm you with the minimum knowledge and tools necessary to get your MEAN (or MERN) application running in a Kubernetes cluster; enabling scalability, fault tolerance, and enhancing reliability. read more

We’ll provide code samples, and let you know any tips and tricks we’ve learned. This session is aimed at full-stack Node.js developers who have heard the hype surrounding Kubernetes and are now ready to try it, whether that be on a laptop or in a cloud environment.

Node.js: The Road to Workers

Over the last 2 years, Anna has been one of the most active contributors to Node.js core. Currently pursuing a Master’s degree in mathematics in Germany, she is fueled by a passion for Node and its community.

Workers, and threading support in general, have been one of the most frequently requested features for Node.js over the last years. read more

Finally, the finishing line is in sight and we’re pretty excited to have experimental support available! This talk will tell you everything around the API, features, use cases & alternatives, our roadmap, and the technical and social challenges that we had to overcome to make it happen!

Orinoco: The new V8 Garbage Collector

About three years ago we started to work on a new garbage collector for V8, codename Orinoco. Orinoco is a high-performance, low-latency, mostly parallel and concurrent garbage collector. read more

Instead of developing Orinoco behind a flag, we changed the old V8 garbage collection codebase on the fly and landed its features incrementally to allow developers and users benefit immediately.

This talk will explain the main Orinoco features, its implementation challenges, and which classes of applications and programming patterns will benefit the most from the new garbage collection architecture.

A new way to profile Node.js

Matteo is a code pirate and mad scientist. He spends most of his days programming in Node.js, but in the past he worked with Ruby, Java and Objective-C. read more

In 2014, he defended his Ph.D. thesis titled 'Application Platforms for the Internet of Things'. Now he is a Principal Architect at nearForm, where he consults for the top brands of the world. Matteo is also the author of the Node.js MQTT Broker, Mosca, the fast logger Pino and of the Fastify web framework. Matteo is also a member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee. Matteo spoke at several international conferences: Node.js Interactive, NodeConf.eu, NodeSummit, LXJS, Distill by Engine Yard, and JsDay to name a few. He is also co-author of the book Javascript: Best Practices edited by FAG, Milan. In the summer he loves sailing the Sirocco.

It’s been weeks and the organization you work for seems to be slowly turning against you. At least that’s what it feels like. read more

User experience is poor because of slow API’s, sales are being missed, performance-linked SEO heuristics are causing a drop in page ranking. Mobile users have all but given up. Operations have reported that a critical Node.js service owned by your team is spinning at 70-100% CPU, and all parts of the application dependent on the service are experiencing intermittent slowdowns or in some cases, complete unavailability. What are you going to do now?

Istio for Node Developers

Lucas is a Sr. Software Engineer at Red Hat. read more

Formerly of the Mobile team, where he focused on the mobile web and front-end development, he is now mostly focused on the Node.js developer experience on Openshift. While I am not a Node expert, I do pretend to be one at work

Microservices are a well know pattern now, and a popular choice for enterprise applications, especially using Node. But microservice application development can seem daunting. read more

How is one supposed to both write an application and also deal with those devOps-y concerns, such as fault tolerance, service-service communication, performance monitoring, tracing and more.

Say hello to the Istio Service Mesh. Istio makes it easy to deal with these concerns.

In this talk we will look at Istio from a developers perspective. How do we start using Istio without going down the devOps rabbit hole? How can we add things, like fault-tolerance, to our current applications, without changing our current code? And what exactly is a Mesh?

Build Scalable APIs using GraphQL and Serverless

Simona is a web developer with experience in building enterprise data visualization tools using Angular and more recently building apps in the cloud. read more

Communities power her up and that’s why she is co-organising the London Javascript and Angular Dublin meetups. Passionate about knowledge sharing, she has mentored at workshops for Women Who Code and NgGirls encouraging women to learn more about programming.

Current trends in software and backend architecture have been evolving towards a more loosely coupled more granular design. I am sure most of you have heard of microservice based architectures. read more

The latest development on that front in the past couple of years has been the advent of serverless which allows you to run applications in very cost effective ephemeral services. This is why it is important to have a proper gateway for your API that is able to route all your requests to the designated endpoint.

GraphQL stands out in that respect as being a mature open sourced standard started at Facebook. We will first have a look at how we set up our own GraphQL server locally, then we will explore the Query language and schema definitions it provides which allows you essentially query your mesh of services from a single point of entry. The beauty of that is it will notify you early if any of your endpoints is misbehaving or the schemas are out of date by erroring out. Another advantage of this is that it allows for your API documentation to be a real time process and it will give you what one may call an API playground where you can query and explore your API.

After we explore our serverless API we will have a look at the more advanced features and standards around mutators and resolvers and then we will close by going all in, full serverless and deploy our graphql server to a function in the cloud.

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