Speakers

Ujjwal Sharma / Node.js Wizard

There’s only one thing more complicated than ES Modules on browsers – ES Modules in Node.js. But how did we get here? How do modules even work? What are the merits and demerits around these conflicting module systems and why does everyone get so emotional while talking about them?

Join me, a Node.js core collaborator and an avid contributor to V8 in order to know all these and more. You will come away with a deep understanding of how the module systems work internally in Node.js and what are the challenges facing these systems, moving forwards.

I am an undergrad student, a Node.js core collaborator, an Electron.js maintainer, a Google Summer of Code mentor and ex-student and have been helping out with v8.

Benedikt Meurer / Technical Lead / Google

In this talk we’re going to take a look at what happened in the V8 project in the past year (which is what to expect in the next version of Node.js), and what’s going to happen in the next year.

Specifically, we will highlight new JavaScript and WebAssembly features.

Benedikt is a software engineer at Google, who worked on V8, the JavaScript engine that powers both Node.js and Chrome, for the past 6 years, and recently switched to work on the Chrome Developer Tools.

In his spare time Benedikt likes hiking in the mountains, or biking in the greater Munich area.

Teddy McZieuwa / VNTA

Building software relies on storing and querying data. Javascript has quite a number of NoSQL databases systems that help to fulfill this purpose. However, depending on the application, it could be necessary to build a custom database. 

Electron.js is a javascript framework that leverages web technologies and node.js to build desktop applications. Building applications with electron.js often requires having some custom database system. It involves a perfect understanding of local node modules such as the file system and more. This talk encompasses javascript developers of all levels. By the end of this talk, everyone should be masters at developing custom NoSQL databases.

I’m Teddy, I am a javascript enthusiast. I work with Node.js for backends as well as react.js and vue.js for frontend. My curiosity in javascript has lead me to its various spectrums and I am really eager to share my knowledge with others.

Bethany Griggs / Software Engineer IBM and Node.js Collaborator

Node.js has just celebrated its 10th birthday. With Node 12 just entering into long-term support, let us look at what is new, the people that have helped us get here, and how you can get involved too.

 

Software Engineer working in IBM Runtime Technologies on a variety of projects all with a focus on Node.js. Her work spans from contributing to, building, and releasing the open source Node.js runtime, to focusing on development and deployment methods for cloud-native Node.js applications.

Tierney Cyren / Senior Cloud Developer Advocate / Microsoft

We talk about community a lot in open source. Communities can make or break any open source project.

There are some common traits–universal lessons that can be taken from working with open source communities–that any open source community can benefit from understanding and approaching thoughtfully.

So what are common traits amongst successful–and not so successful–communities? How can you begin to apply the lessons others have learned, instead of re-inventing the wheel? Most importantly, how can you help ensure _your_ community is successful?

Tierney is a member of the Node.js Community Committee and several other Node.js initiatives. He is a Senior Cloud Developer Advocate at Microsoft who enjoys being unintelligible on Twitter and invariably embarrassing himself.

Ruben Bridgewater / Node.js Collaborator

In this workshop, Ruben will be demonstrating how quick and simple it is to implement best practices error handling in your application.

Together we’ll set up a web server that serves videos. The application is going to use a database, a caching layer and connects to a third party service. All of those receive an individual error handler. We’ll also publish a small module to npm that abstracts our errors that we will use throughout the application.

The overall goal of this workshop is to teach patterns that can be reused in any application to simplify error handling tremendously.

Ruben is a Node.js core collaborator and a freelance software architect consultant. His main emphasis is building powerful and easy-to-use APIs for scalable and fast applications. He is continuously working with the V8 team and the TC39 committee to improve the developer experience with JavaScript.

Julián Duque / Developer and Educator

One common issue I have found working on the field with customers adopting Node.js is that they don’t have visibility around what happens when their applications crash, also, on specific critical applications these unexpected crashes don’t allow the server to exit gracefully missing opportunities to store state for possible recovery actions.

In this talk, I will present a series of best practices on how to deal with `uncaughtExceptions` and `unhandledRejections` in a way that gives developers visibility on errors, post-mortem information and how to handle graceful shutdowns.

Telecommunications Engineer, Software Development specialist and Community Leader with experience in Node.js programming and education

Julie Ng / Cloud Solution Architect / Microsoft

If you have multiple development teams, your cloud architecture probably feels organic changing with agile development cycles. We may ship faster and scale faster. But we can also get lost more easily as complexity grows. Automated monitoring tools come at the price of information overload.

 

Let’s bring some clarity back into the picture by filtering out the technical noise to see how cloud architectures were designed to behave. We’ll create our our own microservice architecture visualization frontend using d3.js. Then we’ll integrate some backend monitoring, sprinkle in some animation with JS and CSS, and voilà – we can watch how our architecture dances – in real time!

Julie is a Cloud Solution Architect at Microsoft, focusing on CI/CD and service-oriented and event-driven architectures. Previously a waitress, english teacher, designer and developer, she is an all-rounder passionate about solving problems with code and people. Away from the computer, she enjoys barefoot running and rock climbing.



Stefan Baumgartner / Dynatrace

Mary had a little LAMP,

and was sure that it can grow,

but once her page went viral,

she watched the whole app blow!

Looking at the monolith,

where everything was destroyed,

she asked herself “where should I start?”

and got easily annoyed.

Let’s end this strange absurdity,

Mary spoke out loud.

She broke it up, piece by piece

And moved everything to the cloud

In this talk you will learn,

an architecture that’s no sham,

Your apps will never ever burn,

I’m sure this is your JAM!

Stefan Baumgartner writes for Manning, Smashing Magazine and A List Apart and made the Kessel run in less than 12 parsecs.

In his spare time, he organizes ScriptConf and DevOne in Linz, and co-hosts the German language Working Draft podcast. Stefan enjoys Italian food, Belgian beer and British vinyl records.

Shelley Vohr / Software Engineer / GitHub

At risk of quoting too many Beatles lyrics, Electron would sing permanently out of key without the dependencies it leverages to create its APIs. 

In this talk, we’ll dive deep into the path of a native Electron function on its journey to become a top-level JavaScript function. With assistance from Node.js, Chromium, and V8, Electron weaves together a complex web of interdependent functions in order to engender creation of modules and APIs that most benefit end-users. 

You’ll come away with a more concrete understanding of how Electron works beneath its surface veneer, as well as tools created within its dependencies that have enabled the Electron project to flourish as it has.

Shelley is a software engineer on the Electron team at GitHub who loves figuring out how to make things work. She’s passionate about clean code & diving deep into tricky problems by using the best tool for the task. She cares about lowering the barrier to entry for engineers across languages, and is also an explorer and crossword puzzle fan powered by more coffee than a human should probably drink.

Chris Dickenson / Engineer / Eaze

Why does the world need another package manager / what’s wrong with npm

JavaScript is an exemplar of a larger problem: code reuse via artifacts with dependency metadata delivered by a registry that controls namespaces and versioning. Registries are poised to provide functionality for communities: security assurances, static analysis, invariants around version availability, user support. JS is special because it has the largest registry and the most code reuse in the wild, but other communities need this too. Docker. Rust. Ruby. Python. This is a problem that communities keep solving and re-solving.

There hasn’t been a satisfactory answer to the problem of funding. Money is ultimately what supports these gossamer webs of packages. Without money, that web disintegrates. At JavaScript’s scale, the money it takes to support the web is enormous. Further, there’s value in expanding this web, and that means more language communities will contribute to this web over time, making it yet more expensive to support. We could give this web to a company with deep pockets, but we’re placing a lot of trust in an entity that’s not entirely incentivized to keep our best interests at heart.

So, the question is: how do we make this web of packages less expensive as it gets bigger? How do we preserve community control of that web? How do we earn the trust of other language communities, so we can solve the problem of artifact dependencies once and reap the benefits across all languages?

We think Entropic is the answer: federated registries and distributed trust recast this ephemeral web of packages in diamond, adamant and self-supporting. We’re excited to work on it and looking forward to presenting this at Nodeconf EU to explain more about what this means.

Chris Dickinson is a former npm registry engineer and Node Technical Steering Committee Emeritus, currently working at Eaze from his home in Portland, OR. In his free time, he illustrates, takes care of his 2 cats, and works on Entropic.

C J Silverio / Energetic Package Maker

Why does the world need another package manager / what’s wrong with npm

JavaScript is an exemplar of a larger problem: code reuse via artifacts with dependency metadata delivered by a registry that controls namespaces and versioning. Registries are poised to provide functionality for communities: security assurances, static analysis, invariants around version availability, user support. JS is special because it has the largest registry and the most code reuse in the wild, but other communities need this too. Docker. Rust. Ruby. Python. This is a problem that communities keep solving and re-solving.

There hasn’t been a satisfactory answer to the problem of funding. Money is ultimately what supports these gossamer webs of packages. Without money, that web disintegrates. At JavaScript’s scale, the money it takes to support the web is enormous. Further, there’s value in expanding this web, and that means more language communities will contribute to this web over time, making it yet more expensive to support. We could give this web to a company with deep pockets, but we’re placing a lot of trust in an entity that’s not entirely incentivized to keep our best interests at heart.

So, the question is: how do we make this web of packages less expensive as it gets bigger? How do we preserve community control of that web? How do we earn the trust of other language communities, so we can solve the problem of artifact dependencies once and reap the benefits across all languages?

We think Entropic is the answer: federated registries and distributed trust recast this ephemeral web of packages in diamond, adamant and self-supporting. We’re excited to work on it and looking forward to presenting this at Nodeconf EU to explain more about what this means.

C J Silverio has been using node since 2011 and was employee number two of npm, Inc.

She’s a huge fan of node.

Bethany Griggs / Software Engineer IBM and Node.js Collaborator

This workshop will show you how to take a Node.js application and make it ready for the cloud: adding support for Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) technologies using the package and templates provided by the CloudNativeJS project. 

You’ll take a typical Node.js application and learn how to extend it to enable Health Checks, Metrics, Docker, Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Grafana. At the end, you’ll have a fully functioning application running as a cluster in Kubernetes, with production monitoring.

Bethany is a Software Engineer working in IBM Runtime Technologies on a variety of projects all with a focus on Node.js. Her work spans from contributing to, building, and releasing the open source Node.js runtime, to focusing on development and deployment methods for cloud-native Node.js applications.

Gireesh Punathil / IBM

A large percentage of Node application misbehavior in production and development can be effectively diagnosed and the root cause identified through the in-built Node.js tracing and diagnostic report capabilities. 

These powerful features can be leveraged in the development, testing and production phases in order to validate that the application architecture and design is reflected in the code without ever instrumenting it. 

In this workshop, we will examine the most common Node.js production issues represented through sample programs, and demonstrate how to diagnose and resolve those issues using the tracing and report tools.

Gireesh Punathil is a member of Node.js Technical Steering Committee and an Architect in IBM India Software Labs, predominantly in Node.js and Java. In 17 years of his career, he has been porting, developing and debugging web servers, virtual machines and compilers. His expertise is in problem isolation and determination of large and complex software modules and has spoken at several Node.js and Java conferences.

Liran Tal / Developer Advocate Snyk and Node.js Security WG member

Malicious packages on npm have been making JavaScript 2018 headlines with several incidents. What makes a package malicious and how can we defend against it? How does the open source model and the human factor play a role in all of this? 

Let’s dissect the anatomy of a malicious package, the risks it carries and review a postmortem of the biggest incidents in the history of npm. We will also learn security best practices to avoid common pitfalls as a developer and a maintainer. 

Can you afford being a developer in 2019 without understanding the security risks involved in working with open source software? Join me to learn how to mitigate and adopt npm related security best practices.

Liran is an energetic member of the Node.js foundation Security WG, the author of Essential Node.js Security, and core contributor at OWASP NodeGoat. As a developer advocate at Snyk he works to create a more secure ecosystem for Node.js and JavaScript and has involved in projects such as leading the MEAN.js framework, and the docker container tool Dockly. Liran is strongly passionate about Open Source since an early age, and enjoys mentoring, and empowering others as they make their way in the community.

Anu Srivastava / Google / Google Cloud

Say goodbye to the days of TPS. Join us as we show how you can string together your emails, docs, charts, all of it—into one gorgeous report, ready to email off. You can combine all your data— from GitHub metrics, monitoring data, to surveys — with this wide-ranging platform that involves “human” tools, such as a Calendar and Contacts. 

Thanks to a helpful client library, Node.js is the glue that you can use to code up all the business work, so that you can get back to the business of coding.

This talk will be co-hosted with Franziska Hinkelmann.

Anu works in Developer Relations for G Suite in New York. She advocates for developers building on top of the G Suite platform to enhance their businesses, specifically focusing on the APIs for Docs, Sheets and Slides. She previously worked as a software engineer on Android and Cloud in the California Bay Area. In her free time she likes to perform with her dance group in Manhattan.

Franziska Hinkelmann / Google / Google Cloud, TSC

Say goodbye to the days of TPS. Join us as we show how you can string together your emails, docs, charts, all of it—into one gorgeous report, ready to email off. You can combine all your data— from GitHub metrics, monitoring data, to surveys — with this wide-ranging platform that involves “human” tools, such as a Calendar and Contacts. 

Thanks to a helpful client library, Node.js is the glue that you can use to code up all the business work, so that you can get back to the business of coding.

This talk will be co-hosted with Anu Srivastava.

Franziska has a Ph.D. in mathematics and is a Senior Engineer at Google working on the Cloud Platform team in New York City. She’s a member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee and an expert on JavaScript performance. When she’s not working hard on making Node.js better on the Cloud Platform, she’s probably out riding horses.

Stephen Belanger / Node.js Application Performance Monitoring Agent / Elastic

Async iterators make stream processing much easier than using Node.js core streams. Let’s investigate a few common use cases and analyze the performance profile.

Async iterators are here, but have seen minimal adoption so far. It seems many are still wary of it likely due to the long proclaimed overhead of promises. However, promise performance has improved dramatically over time and async iterator performance can actually be on-par with Node.js streams at this point, if used correctly. The performance benefit of Node.js streams comes mostly from buffering which can be layered over async iterators easily enough.

I will walk through a few scenarios where async iterators can make complex behaviours fairly easy to build and then I will go over performance implications and point out pitfalls to consider when using async iterators in performance-sensitive code.

 

Stephen has been working with Node.js since 2010 and working on diagnostics and performance monitoring tools since early 2013. He loves to travel and meet new people, especially ones who live life differently from him. He is powered by curiosity and empathy. 🙂

Alex Korzhikov / ING Bank N.V., Amsterdam / Dev IT Engineer at ING

We will start with theory – overview key concepts of building a Command Line Interface program. By making a tiny example in Node.js, we will explore npm and package.json capabilities, compare different technologies. 

We will build a TypeScript based pluggable CLI with Oclif framework and design internals business logic. In the last part we will introduce Continuous Integration with Github and polish program UX and output using various libraries. 

In 3 hours we’ll write a complete CLI application. You’ll have a project in your Github repository, ready to use and evolve. You will know how it is designed, understand technologies and best practices it is following

Software engineer, team lead, instructor, mentor, and author of technical materials with 10 years of programming experience

Pavlik Kiselev / ING Bank N.V., Amsterdam / Dev IT Engineer at ING

We will start with theory – overview key concepts of building a Command Line Interface program. By making a tiny example in Node.js, we will explore npm and package.json capabilities, compare different technologies. 

We will build a TypeScript based pluggable CLI with Oclif framework and design internals business logic. In the last part we introduce Continuous Integration with Github and polish program UX and output using various libraries.

In 3 hours we’ll write a complete CLI application. You’ll have a project in your Github repository, ready to use and evolve. You will know how it is designed, understand technologies and best practices it is following

Luca Maraschi / Chief Architect / Telus Digital

Enterprise is investing in their next generation data lake, aiming to democratize data at scale to provide business insights and ultimately generate automated intelligent decisions. Data platforms based on the data lake architecture have common failure modes that lead to unfulfilled promises at scale. 

To address these failure modes we need to shift from the centralized paradigm of a lake, or its predecessor: the data warehouse. Rather, we need to move the frame to one that draws from modern distributed architecture In order to achieve this shift, domains should be considered as a first class concern, platform thinking should be applied to create self-serve data infrastructure and data should be treated as a product. 

With architectural explanations and clear examples, this talk explores how Telus Digital became a centre of excellence for digital oriented experiences using technologies such Fastify and GraphQL are used at the core of Telus’s Digital Platform supporting million of users on telus.com.

Luca’s passion for the tech industry started at the young age of just 6 years old when he began coding. His passion and thirst for knowledge led him to graduate with a Masters in Artificial Intelligence from MIT. 

Since then Luca founded and successfully exited 3 companies. While managing large teams, he has designed and delivered large scale real-time systems for some of the industry leaders in gaming, banking and mobile technologies. 

He is currently serving as Chief Architect in Telus Digital. Luca’s core focus is on creating business value through building out, architecting and overseeing Cloud Technology, Big Data , AI and large distributed systems.

Michael Dawson / IBM / IBM Community Lead for Node.js

The module ecosystem is a key ingredient in the success of the JavaScript ecosystem. Unfortunately, it is a challenge ensuring that key modules are maintained, safe and kept up to date. The resulting pain is felt by users of the modules, the original module authors who often would like to help but no longer can for any number of reasons, and even those who would like to help but can’t. 

In this talk, we’ll cover how we might tackle this problem, an initiative to start working on the problem within the Node.js project and how you can get involved and help out.

Michael Dawson is an active contributor to the Node.js project and chair of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee(TSC). He contributes to a broad range of community efforts including platform support, build infrastructure, N-API, Release, as well as tools to help the community achieve quality with speed (ex: ci jobs, benchmarking and code coverage reporting). 

As IBM Node.js community lead, he works with IBM’s internal teams to plan and facilitate their contributions to Node.js and v8 within the Node and Google communities.Past experience includes building IBM’s Java runtime, building and operating client facing e-commerce applications, building PKI and symmetric based crypto solutions as well as a number of varied consulting engagements. In his spare time, he uses Node.js to automate his home and life for fun.

Dominykas Blyžė / FullStack Developer / NearForm

The module ecosystem is a key ingredient in the success of the JavaScript ecosystem. Unfortunately, it is a challenge ensuring that key modules are maintained, safe and kept up to date. The resulting pain is felt by users of the modules, the original module authors who often would like to help but no longer can for any number of reasons, and even those who would like to help but can’t. 

In this talk, we’ll cover how we might tackle this problem, an initiative to start working on the problem within the Node.js project and how you can get involved and help out.

Dominykas is a full-stack developer with a passion for frontend and some interests in not front-end, namely build tooling and security.

He’s been using Node.js since its early days and remains as excited about it as ever.

Jan Lehnardt / CEO at neighbourhood.ie

What do CouchDB, mustache.js, CouchApps, PouchDB, Node.js, Hoodie, The Cloud, Docker, Kubernetes, and Serverless in common? They form a natural progression in a way that is completely not obvious in 2019 and that wasn’t completely obvious in 2009 when it all began. But if you look closely, you can spot the dots that connect all of these things.

 

This is the story of how emergent trends accumulate in the most interesting communities. It shows the road from idea to mass adoption, from prototype to scale by way of example of a number of projects that never made it to the mainstream, but that defined the mainstream more than you would imagine today.

 

The lessons learned will help you to divide the good ideas from the bad ideas for your future projects, by analysing why the good ideas that are common today won over the bad ones in the past, when both are indistinguishable, while you’re in the thick of it.

Makes @couchdb @hoodiehq @jsconfeu @greenkeeperio & @offlinefirst

Ryan Jarvinen / Developer Advocate / Red Hat

Learn to build and deploy cloud-native Node.js applications on Kubernetes and OpenShift through a series of hands-on lab examples.

This interactive workshop involves using kubectl, oc, curl, and common command-line tools to interact with Kubernetes APIs. By the end of this lab, you’ll be deploying, scaling, and automating JS-based distributed solutions using containers, Kubernetes, and other popular open source tools for distributed computing.

By the end of this lab, you’ll be deploying, scaling, and automating JS-based distributed solutions using containers, Kubernetes, and other popular open source tools for distributed computing. These examples are designed to show JS developers how to maintain speed and productivity with a container-based development workflow.

Ryan Jarvinen is a Developer Advocate (Red Hat, previously CoreOS) who focuses on developer experience and usability in the Cloud Native ecosystem. 

He is a frequent conference speaker and workshop leader who enjoys discussing distributed solutions architecture and helping teams develop strategies for maximizing their productivity using Kubernetes. 

He works remotely from Sacramento, California as a part of Red Hat’s OpenShift team, but you can reach him online as “RyanJ” via twitter, github, or IRC.

Jan Kleinert / Developer Advocate / Red Hat

Learn to build and deploy cloud-native Node.js applications on Kubernetes and OpenShift through a series of hands-on lab examples.

This interactive workshop involves using kubectl, oc, curl, and common command-line tools to interact with Kubernetes APIs. By the end of this lab, you’ll be deploying, scaling, and automating JS-based distributed solutions using containers, Kubernetes, and other popular open source tools for distributed computing.

By the end of this lab, you’ll be deploying, scaling, and automating JS-based distributed solutions using containers, Kubernetes, and other popular open source tools for distributed computing. These examples are designed to show JS developers how to maintain speed and productivity with a container-based development workflow.

 

 

Jan Kleinert is a Developer Advocate at Red Hat, where she focuses on OpenShift and the developer experience for developers working with containers and Kubernetes.

 Prior to joining Red Hat, she worked in a variety of roles ranging from developer relations to web analytics and conversion optimization.

Theodore Vorillas / Software Engineer / Workable

The year is 2019, and accessibility is not a buzzword anymore. It’s now imperative that information is readily available to everyone, regardless of their disability or financial status.

In this talk, you’ll find out how to create a low-cost Braille display, using run-of-the-mill JavaScript and the basic principles of Internet of Things. Live demo included.

Theodore is a software engineer at Workable in Athens, currently working with a large scale JavaScript codebase.

He recently started researching A11Y and he realized he could combine IoT and JavaScript to help visually impaired people.

He loves FOSS, coffee, drones, woodworking and DIYing all the things.



Albert L.Lash IV / Senior Software Engineer / Bloomberg

It’s impractical to add two numbers using types in TypeScript other than to dig deeper into types and get a better understanding of how they work.

Join Ricardo and I for this number theory workshop using TypeScript types to add two numbers — instead of values. Feel free to branch off with your own experiments with types.

Albert started off studying Human Factors Engineering and taught himself to write code from there. He’s previously run a business servicing retail banks in the US, worked at a non-profit in Washington D.C., and now works in New Energy Finance Engineering at Bloomberg in London. He has contributed to many open source projects, including git and rails.

Ricardo Leon / Senior Web Architect / Bloomberg

It’s impractical to add two numbers using types in TypeScript other than to dig deeper into types and get a better understanding of how they work.

Join Albert and I for this number theory workshop using TypeScript types to add two numbers — instead of values. Feel free to branch off with your own experiments with types.

Ricardo is a Team Leader at Bloomberg, where he has worked on building web applications applied for clients in the capital markets space. As a developer, he has worked building large-scale entertainment media, news, and financial web applications.  Ricardo volunteers at schools teaching coding to help diversify the software development community.

 

Mx. Kassian Wren / DevRel / Cloudfare

WebAssembly has been around for years but is only just starting to gain real traction in the developer space. What is WebAssembly? Is it going to replace JavaScript?! Signs say no, but it still has the potential to have a huge impact on JavaScript development in the browser and in Node.JS. Let’s walk through the how and why of this amazing new language feature through code and discussion.

Kas is a DevRel for Cloudfare by day, an EE student, twitch streamer, and hardware addict by night. They also parent two lovely cats. (They/their/them)

Tomas Della Vedova / Software Engineer / Elastic

We all know the problems of migrating a monolith to a microservices architecture. Mixed logic, cross-dependencies and way too many edge cases to test. Wouldn’t be great to have a framework that helps you build a modular, consistent and pluggable system? 

Enter Fastify, a new web framework for Node.js. Fastify offers an extremely flexible plugin system that allows complete customization of the framework. Every plugin could be packaged as an independent module and then deployed as microservice or as a part of a monolith. 

In this workshop, we will discuss and then implement the key elements of an Enterprise Node.js application, such as tracing, logging, database connectors, testing and code reuse.

Tomas is an enthusiastic software engineer, who spends most of his time programming in Javascript and Node.js. He works for Elastic as Software Engineer in the clients team, focusing on the JavaScript client. Tomas is also the author of the Fastify web framework and part of its ecosystem. He constantly forwards the enrichment of his knowledge and the exploration of new technologies; moreover, he is a strong Open Source supporter and he will always be passionate about technology, design, and music.

Matteo Collina / Technical Director / NearForm

We all know the problems of migrating a monolith to a microservices architecture. Mixed logic, cross-dependencies and way too many edge cases to test. Wouldn’t be great to have a framework that helps you build a modular, consistent and pluggable system? 

Enter Fastify, a new web framework for Node.js. Fastify offers an extremely flexible plugin system that allows complete customization of the framework. Every plugin could be packaged as an independent module and then deployed as microservice or as a part of a monolith. 

In this workshop, we will discuss and then implement the key elements of an Enterprise Node.js application, such as tracing, logging, database connectors, testing and code reuse.

Matteo is Technical Director at NearForm, where he consults for some of the top brands in the world. In 2014, he defended his Ph.D. thesis titled “Application Platforms for the Internet of Things”. Matteo is a member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee focusing on streams, diagnostics and http. 

He is also the author of the fast logger Pino and of the Fastify web framework. Matteo is a renowned international speaker after presenting at more than 50 conferences, including Node.js Interactive, NodeConf.eu, NodeSummit, JSConf.Asia, WebRebels, and JsDay just to name a few. 

He is also co-author of the book “Node.js Cookbook, Third Edition” edited by Packt. In the summer he loves sailing the Sirocco.

 

 

James Snell / Head of Research / NearForm

We implemented the QUIC protocol for Node.js. Here’s how we did it, why, and a look at the fun things you can do with it.

James has 20+ years’ experience in the software industry and is a well-known figure in the global Node.js community. He has been an author, co-author, contributor, or editor of several W3C semantic web and IETF internet standards.

He is a core contributor to the Node.js project, is a member of the Node.js Technical Steering Committee (TSC), and has served on the Node.js Foundation Board of Directors as the TSC representative.

Thomas Watson / Node.js Developer / Elastic

To get insights into the performance of your application and what specifically it’s spending time on, you need good tracing tools.

Historically however, it’s been very difficult to implement tracers in Node.js due to its async nature and the lack of an official context propagation API in core.

Throw modern deployment architectures into the mix, and you also need to deal with distributed tracing across multiple microservices.

This talk is about how tracers work behind the scenes, which pitfalls exists and the work going on in the Node.js Diagnostics Working Group, in W3C, and within other standard organizations to improve the situation.

Thomas Watson is a computer programmer, public speaker, and open source hacker. He works on Application Performance Monitoring at Elastic, the company behind Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. Thomas has published hundreds of Node modules and mad science projects, he is a Node.js Core member, and a part of the Node.js Diagnostics Working Group at the OpenJS Foundation.

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